Upstate Church partners with Law Enforcement to Collect Guns - WSPA.com

Upstate Church partners with Law Enforcement to Collect Guns

Upstate Church partners with Law Enforcement to Collect Guns

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An Easter Egg hunt was followed by a gun buyback Saturday in Barnet Park. The New Life Deliverance Church waited two hours for kids to clean up the eggs before they invited Spartanburg Public Safety to help them collect guns from the public.

"It's a great opportunity to present the gospel and make a significant impact in the community while taking firearms off the streets," said Head Pastor Bunty Desor.

His Assistant Pastor Andre Tate agreed. He said it's a great way to try to get the guns out of the hands of those who would use them to do harm.

"The less guns on the street, the less lives may be destroyed behind a gun," said Tate.

Eighteen months ago, church leaders said a 17 year old boy was shot and found stumbling onto a church yard, on the Northside of town.

That incident is what prompted them to contact Spartanburg Public Safety, so they could hold this gun buy back.

"Were proponents of the 2nd Amendment but its important we get the guns that are being used for violence," said Desor.

Church leaders said police helped make the event safe. 7 On Your Side asked police if just anyone can hold a gun buy back. Officials said there are no set rules but you should contact police to be there.

People who returned guns, like Benny Mullins, said having officers there made them feel safer.

Officers checked for loaded weapons and guns that could be broken.

"This was a good way to get the gun off the street and put a few dollars in your pocket," said Vickie Pierce who returned a gun Saturday.

 

"I know some people might have anxiety about turning in guns with law enforcement but there's anonymity and it's a safe place to turn it in," said Desor.

Spokesperson Art Littlejohn, who is a Captain at Spartanburg Public Safety the guns are collected and turned in as evidence. If they don't show up as stolen they contact a local business to take them apart.

"I had it in my gun case and it wasn't doing me no good so it's for a good cause and they can do something with it," said Mullins.

Leaders said they collected 16 guns Saturday which is their best turnout yet. They said they'll continue to do it in the future to try to save lives

Spartanburg Public Safety said you can contact your local law enforcement agency in the future to turn in your gun or if you find one on your property. 

The South Carolina Law Enforcement Division has much more about SC gun laws on their website.

You can also visit the SC state Legislature website for more information.

To contact the New Life Deliverance Church, click here.

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