Remains Of Boston Marathon Bombing Suspect Claimed - WSPA.com

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Remains Of Boston Marathon Bombing Suspect Claimed

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Remains of Boston Marathon bombing suspect claimed

The body of Boston Marathon bombing suspect Tamerlan Tsarnaev has been claimed.

Massachusetts Department of Public Safety spokesman Terrel Harris says a funeral home retained by Tsarnaev's family picked up his body Thursday. He has no more information.

Tsarnaev's widow in Rhode Island had wanted his side of the family to claim his body. His uncle in Maryland had said the family would claim it.

Tsarnaev died after a gunfight with authorities.

Police have said he ran out of ammunition before his younger brother dragged his body under a vehicle while fleeing the scene.

Brother Dzhokhar Tsarnaev faces a charge of using a weapon of mass destruction to kill.

Their mother says the allegations are lies.

Kazakhstan says it cooperating with US in probe

Kazakhstan's Foreign Ministry says it is cooperating with the United States in the case of two of its citizens arrested in connection with the Boston Marathon bombing.

Dias Kadyrbayev and Azamat Tazhayakov were university friends of bombing suspect Dzhokhar Tsarnaev. They were charged Wednesday with attempting to destroy evidence by disposing of a backpack and laptop computer taken from his room after they found he was a suspect in the fatal bombing.

On Thursday, the Kazakh foreign ministry issued a statement saying "Both Kadyrbayev and Tazhayakov are cooperating with the investigative bodies and providing them assistance."

"As we have repeatedly stressed, Kazakhstan strongly condemns any form of terrorism. The Kazakhstan side is cooperating with the U.S. law enforcement bodies in their investigation," the ministry said.

Scholarship named in honor of marathon victim

A suburban Boston community college has established a scholarship in memory of a marathon bombing victim.

MassBay Community College announced Wednesday that the scholarship would go to a business major from Massachusetts in honor of Krystle Campbell.

The 29-year-old earned a degree in business administration from the Wellesley school in 2005.

The Medford native and Arlington resident was one of three people killed by the April 15 bombings at the marathon's finish line. She was there to watch a friend run.

Candidates must be carrying a full course load, and must submit an essay about resiliency, making a difference, generosity of spirit, or overcoming obstacles to achieve a goal.

President John O'Donnell says the school "lost one of our own on that horrific day."

UMass: 1 arrested is suspended, 2 not enrolled

The University of Massachusetts at Dartmouth has suspended one student charged in connection with the Boston Marathon bombings and says the other two aren't enrolled.

The university said Wednesday that Azamat Tazhayakov has been suspended "pending the outcome of the case." He and Dias Kadyrbayev were charged with conspiring to obstruct justice.

Robel Phillipos was charged with making false statements. The university says Kadyrbayez and Phillipos aren't enrolled.

The FBI says the three removed a backpack containing hollowed-out fireworks from the dorm room of bombing suspect Dzhokhar Tsarnaev three days after the bombings. Their attorneys say they had no idea the attack was being planned.

The FBI says the three began attending UMass Dartmouth with Tsarnaev in 2011.

The university says it's cooperating fully with authorities.

Official: Arrested student entered US without visa

A federal law enforcement official says one of the students from Kazakhstan arrested Wednesday in the Boston Marathon bombings was allowed to return to the United States this year despite not having a valid student visa. Authorities say that after the explosions he helped remove a laptop and backpack from the bombing suspect's dormitory room before the FBI searched it.

The official says Azamat Tazhayakov (AHZ'-maht tuh-ZAYE'-uh-kov) left the U.S. in December. Tazhayakov's student-visa status was terminated in early January after he was academically dismissed from the University of Massachusetts Dartmouth, the official says. Despite not having a valid student visa, Tazhayakov was allowed to re-enter the U.S. on Jan. 20.

The official spoke on the condition of anonymity because the official was not authorized to discuss details of Tazhayakov's immigration status.

3 men charged in connection with Boston bomb case

Three men who attended college with the Boston Marathon suspect have been charged in connection with the case.

Azamat Tazhayakov and Dias Kadyrbayev are charged with conspiring to obstruct justice. A third man, Robel Phillipos, is charged with making false statements to federal investigators.

An FBI affidavit says the three men removed bombing suspect Dzhokhar Tsarnaev's backpack from his dorm room at the University of Massachusetts at Dartmouth three days after the bombing.

The affidavit says Tazhayakov and Kadyrbayev agreed to get rid of it after concluding from news reports that Tsarnaev was one of the bombers.

A court appearance for the three is scheduled for Wednesday afternoon.

Lawyer: 2 arrested anew are suspect's friends

A lawyer says two of the three people newly arrested in the Boston Marathon bombing case are men originally from Kazakhstan who were friendly with the main suspect.

Azamat Tazhayakov and Dias Kadyrbayev appeared via video for a visa violation hearing in immigration court in Boston on Wednesday.

Boston attorney Linda Cristello represented them and confirmed they now face separate federal charges and have a court appearance this afternoon related to the Boston Marathon bombing.

She says lawyers don't know what the charges are and won't until later.

The two have been held in a county jail for more than a week on allegations that they violated their student visas while attending the University of Massachusetts Dartmouth with suspect Dzhokhar Tsarnaev, who is originally from Russia.

Cristello did not say who the third suspect was.

Boston police: 3 more suspects in custody bombings

Boston police say three more suspects have been taken into custody in the marathon bombings.

In a tweet Wednesday morning, the police department says only that three more suspects are in custody and more details will follow. Police spokeswoman Cheryl Fiandaca confirmed the tweet but referred all other questions to the FBI.

Three people were killed and more than 260 injured on April 15 when two bombs exploded near the finish line.

Suspect Tamerlan Tsarnaev died after a gunfight with police several days later. His brother, Dzhokhar Tsarnaev, was captured and lies in a hospital prison.

Both are Russian natives who lived for several years in the U.S. They are accused of using a weapon of mass destruction.

High-profile attorney representing Tsarnaev

An attorney who represented the Unabomber has signed on to represent Boston bombing suspect Dzhokhar Tsarnaev.

San Diego attorney Judy Clarke also has represented Susan Smith, who drowned her two children and Atlanta Olympics bomber Eric Rudolph.

Meanwhile, the FBI has searched the home of the older Tsarnaev brother's in-laws. Tamerlan Tsarnaev was killed in a shootout with police.

Widow's parents' home searched

The attorney for the wife of dead Boston bombing suspect Tamerlan Tsarnaev's  says his widow is doing everything she can to help with the investigation.

On Monday, FBI agents went to her parents' home, where Katherine Russell has been staying since her husband was killed in a shootout with police.

Russell's 19-year-old brother-in-law is charged with using a weapon of mass destruction.

Hospital gives update on patients

A Boston hospital says the number of patients it is treating for injuries sustained in the marathon bombing continues to drop, two weeks after the attack that killed three and injured more than 260.

Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center says that by Sunday morning, it had six patients with injuries from the bombing, down from more than 20 in the days immediately following the April 15 attack.

Hospital spokesman Jerry Berger says all six patients are in good or fair condition.

Beth Israel also treated 19-year-old bombing suspect Dzhohkar Tsarnaev for injuries authorities say he suffered during an attempt to elude police. Tsarnaev was moved Friday to a federal prison medical center.

In all, 26 hospitals have treated people with injuries from the bombing.

Lawmaker believes Boston suspects were trained

The chairman of the House Homeland Security Committee says he believes the Boston Marathon bombing suspects had some training in carrying out their attack.

Rep. Michael McCaul is citing the type of device used in the attack - shrapnel-packed pressure-cooker bombs - and the weapons' sophistication as signs of training.

Homemade bombs built from pressure cookers have been a frequent weapon of militants in Afghanistan, India and Pakistan. Al-Qaida's branch in Yemen once published an online manual on how to make one.

McCaul also tells "Fox News Sunday" that he thinks the suspects' mother played "a very strong role" in her sons' radicalization process and that if she were to return to the United States from Russia, she'd be held for questioning.

Boston suspects' father postpones trip to US

The father of the two Boston bombing suspects says he is postponing a trip to the United States because of poor health.

Anzor Tsarnaev told The Associated Press on Sunday that he is "really sick" and his blood pressure had spiked.

Tsarnaev said last week that he planned to travel from Russia to the U.S. with the hope of seeing his younger son, who is under arrest, and burying his elder son, who was killed in a clash with police.

Tsarnaev confirmed that he is staying in Chechnya, a province in southern Russia, but did not specify whether he was hospitalized.

Until Friday, he and the suspects' mother had been living in the neighboring province of Dagestan.

Search of landfill complete 

The FBI has concluded its search of a landfill near a Massachusetts college where the 19-year-old suspect in the Boston Marathon bombings was a student.

FBI spokeswoman Laura Eimiller says the two-day search ended Friday. Eimiller wouldn't say what investigators were looking for or whether they recovered anything from the landfill.

Bombing suspect Dzhokhar Tsarnaev was a sophomore at the University of Massachusetts-Dartmouth. Students say he returned to the campus after the bombings.

Two of his college friends were detained April 20 and were being held at a Boston jail for violating their student visas by not regularly attending classes. A lawyer for one says the two students have been interviewed by FBI agents, cooperated fully and aren't suspects in the attack.

Also, two college buddies of the suspect have been questioned, but a lawyer says they had nothing to do with the attacks. He says the two are being detained in a Boston jail for violating their student visas by not regularly attending classes.

And U.S. officials said his mother had been added to a federal terrorism database months before the April 15 attack. His mother said it's all "lies."

Boston Marathon finish line area reopens

The area near the Boston Marathon finish line is reopening to the general public.

Traffic was allowed to flow all the way down Boylston Street on Wednesday morning for the first time since two explosions on April 15 killed three spectators and sent more than 260 to the hospital.

Delivery trucks made their way down the street under a heavy police presence.

Workers at some businesses and hotels in the area were allowed to return to their jobs on Tuesday to prepare for reopening.

Some stores directly affected by the blasts are still boarded up.

The Copley subway station that had been closed since the bombings also reopened, while the main branch of the Boston Public Library also was scheduled to reopen Wednesday.

Investigation Continues

Investigators are piecing together the events that led up to last week's Boston Marathon bombings.

Authorities have learned Tamerlan Tsarnaev bought fireworks at a New Hampshire store six weeks before the explosions.

Officials are now trying to determine if the Tsarnaev brothers used the black powder from the fireworks to build the pressure cooker bombs.

Lawmakers ask if intel blocked before Boston bombs

Lawmakers say U.S. law enforcement and other agencies may not have shared enough intelligence about the Boston Marathon bombing suspects in the months before the deadly bombings.

But none of the lawmakers are saying - yet- that better sharing could have stopped the attacks, after FBI officials briefed them on the investigation Tuesday.

The chairwoman and top Republican on the Senate Intelligence Committee - Dianne Feinstein and Saxby Chambliss - say the incident showed there was a lack of sharing of some information, despite intelligence-sharing reforms implemented after the Sept. 11 attacks.

Officials say Homeland Security officials were tracking now-deceased suspect Tamerlan Tsarnaev's trip to Russia last year, for instance, but were not coordinating their suspicions with the FBI.

Investigators suspect he may have become radicalized during that journey.

Official: Brothers Didn't Have Gun Permits

A Massachusetts police official say the brothers suspected of bombing the Boston Marathon before having shootouts with authorities didn't have gun permits.

Cambridge Police Commissioner Robert Haas tells The Associated Press in an interview Sunday that neither Tamerlan Tsarnaev nor his brother Dzhokhar had permission to carry firearms.

He says it's unclear whether either ever applied and the applications aren't considered public records.

Officials: Bomb Suspects Appear Motivated By Faith

The two brothers suspected of bombing the Boston Marathon appear to have been motivated by their religious faith but do not seem connected to any Muslim terrorist groups, U.S. officials said Monday after interrogating the severely wounded younger man. He was charged with federal crimes that could bring the death penalty.

Dzhokhar Tsarnaev, 19, was charged in his hospital room with using a weapon of mass destruction to kill. He was accused of joining with his older brother, Tamerlan - now dead - in setting off the pressure-cooker bombs that killed three people and wounded more than 200 a week ago.

The brothers, ethnic Chechens from Russia who had been living in the U.S. for about a decade, practiced Islam.

Two U.S. officials said preliminary evidence from an interrogation suggests the brothers were motivated by religion but were apparently not tied to any Islamic terrorist organizations. The officials spoke on condition of anonymity because they were not authorized to publicly discuss the investigation.

The criminal complaint containing the charges against Dzhokhar Tsarnaev shed no light on the motive.

But it gave a detailed sequence of events and cited surveillance-camera images of him dropping off a knapsack with one of the bombs and using a cellphone, perhaps to coordinate or detonate the blasts.

The Massachusetts college student was listed in serious but stable condition at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center with a gunshot wound to the throat and other injuries. His 26-year-old brother died last week in a fierce gunbattle with police.

"Although our investigation is ongoing, today's charges bring a successful end to a tragic week for the city of Boston and for our country," Attorney General Eric Holder said in a statement.

The charges carry the death penalty or a prison sentence of up to life.

"He has what's coming to him," a wounded Kaitlynn Cates said from her hospital room. She was at the finish line when the first blast knocked her off her feet, and she suffered an injury to her lower leg.

In outlining the evidence against him in court papers, the FBI said Tsarnaev was seen on surveillance cameras putting a knapsack down on the ground near the site of the second blast and then manipulating a cellphone and lifting it to his ear.

Seconds later, the first explosion went off about a block down the street and spread fear and confusion through the crowd. But Tsarnaev - unlike nearly everyone around him - looked calm and quickly walked away, the FBI said.

Just 10 seconds or so later, the second blast occurred where he had left the knapsack, the FBI said.

The FBI did not make it clear whether authorities believe he used his cellphone to detonate one or both of the bombs or whether he was talking to someone.

The court papers also said that during the long night of crime Thursday and Friday that led to the older brother's death and the younger one's capture, one of the Tsarnaev brothers told a carjacking victim: "Did you hear about the Boston explosion? I did that."

In addition to the federal charges, the younger Tsarnaev brother is also likely to face state charges in connection with the shooting death of an MIT police officer.

The Obama administration said it had no choice but to prosecute Tsarnaev in the federal court system. Some politicians had suggested he be tried as an enemy combatant in front of a military tribunal, where defendants are denied some of the usual U.S. constitutional protections.

But Tsarnaev is a naturalized U.S. citizen, and under U.S. law, American citizens cannot be tried by military tribunals, White House spokesman Jay Carney said. Carney said that since 9/11, the federal court system has been used to convict and imprison hundreds of terrorists.

In its criminal complaint, the FBI said it searched Tsarnaev's dorm room at the University of Massachusetts-Dartmouth on Sunday and found BBs as well as a white hat and dark jacket that look like those worn by one of one of the suspected bombers in the surveillance photos the FBI released a few days after the attack.

Seven days after the bombings, meanwhile, Boston was bustling Monday, with runners hitting the pavement, children walking to school and enough cars clogging the streets to make the morning commute feel almost back to normal.

Residents paused in the afternoon to observe a moment of silence at 2:50 p.m., the time of the first blast. Church bells tolled across the city and state in tribute to the victims.

Standing on the steps of the state Capitol, Massachusetts Gov. Deval Patrick bowed his head and said after the moment of silence: "God bless the people of Massachusetts. Boston Strong."

On Boylston Street, where the bombing took place, the silence was broken when a Boston police officer pumped his fists in the air and the crowd erupted in applause. The crowd then quietly sang "God Bless America."

Also, hundreds of family and friends packed a church in Medford for the funeral of bombing victim Krystle Campbell, a 29-year-old restaurant worker. A memorial service was scheduled for Monday night at Boston University for 23-year-old Lu Lingzi, a graduate student from China.

Fifty-one victims remained hospitalized Monday, three of them in critical condition.

At the Snowden International School on Newbury Street, a high school set just a block from the bombing site, jittery parents dropped off children as teachers - some of whom had run in the race - greeted each other with hugs.

Carlotta Martin of Boston said that leaving her kids at school has been the hardest part of getting back to normal.

"We're right in the middle of things," Martin said outside the school as her children, 17-year-old twins and a 15-year-old, walked in, glancing at the police barricades a few yards from the school's front door.

"I'm nervous. Hopefully, this stuff is over," she continued. "I told my daughter to text me so I know everything's OK."

Tsarnaev was captured Friday night after an intense all-day manhunt that brought the Boston area to a near-standstill. He was cornered and seized, wounded and bloody, after he was discovered hiding in a tarp-covered boat in a Watertown backyard.

He had apparent gunshot wounds to the head, neck, legs and hand, the FBI said in court papers.

Meanwhile, investigators in the Boston suburb of Waltham are looking into whether there are links between Tamerlan Tsarnaev and an unsolved 2011 slaying. Tsarnaev was a friend of one of three men found dead in an apartment with their necks slit and their bodies reportedly covered with marijuana.

Boston Marathon bombing suspect is charged

The Boston marathon bombing suspect has been charged with using and conspiring to use a weapon of mass destruction against persons and property resulting in death.

In a statement Monday, U.S. Attorney General Eric Holder detailed charges against 19-year-old Dzhokhar Tsarnaev.

The charges carry a possible death sentence if he is convicted.

Tsarnaev made his initial court appearance in his room in Beth Israel hospital. He is listed in serious but stable condition.

Officials say Tsarnaev and his older brother set off the twin explosions at Monday's marathon, killing three people and injuring more than 180 others

Gary Wente is circuit executive of the 1st U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals. He says the suspect made his first appearance before a magistrate judge Monday afternoon in Beth Israel hospital.

Officials say Tsarnaev and his older brother set off the twin explosions at Monday's marathon, killing three people and injuring more than 180 others.

The FBI says in an affidavit that the Boston Marathon bombing suspect was seen using a cellphone after placing a knapsack on the ground at an explosion site.

The document does not say whether suspect Dzhokhar Tsarnaev is thought to have used the cellphone as a detonator.

The affidavit also says one of the bombers told a carjacking victim, "Did you hear about the Boston explosion? I did that."

It says Tsarnaev had apparent gunshot wounds to the head, neck, legs, and hand when he was brought to a hospital after his capture Friday.

Boston Returns To Work, School

Bostonians are back at work and at school for the first time since a dramatic week came to an even more dramatic end on Friday.

Authorities had made the unprecedented request that residents stay home during the manhunt for Dzokhar Tsarnaev, the surviving suspect in the Boston Marathon bombings.

He was found Friday evening hiding in a boat covered by a tarp -- hours after his older brother was killed during a violent getaway attempt.

Traffic has been heavy on major arteries into the city today. Parents are dropping their children off at schools, some for the first time since last Monday's bombings that killed three people.

At a high school just a block from the bombing site, Carlotta Martin said leaving her kids there has been the hardest part of getting back to normal. Her children, 17-year-old twins and a 15-year-old, walked into the building, glancing at the police barricades a few yards from the front door.

Martin said she's "nervous," and added, "Hopefully, this stuff is over." She said she told her daughter to text her so she'll know everything is OK.

On Norfolk Street, where the suspects lived, neighbors say they thought they saw some more detectives this morning. But unlike Friday, the street is open today.

One Week Since Bombings

Monday afternoon marks one week since two bombs went off at the Boston Marathon, killing three people and wounding more than 180.

There'll be a moment of silence today at 2:50 p.m., the time the first bomb exploded.

Meanwhile, authorities are waiting to question the widow of bombing suspect Tamerlan Tsarnaev, who was killed Friday while trying to get away from police.

His 19-year-old brother Dzhokhar was shot in the throat and can't speak.

Authorities waiting to question bombing suspect widow

An attorney for the widow of one of the Boston Marathon bombing suspects says she didn't know her husband was a suspect until she saw it on TV.

The attorney says Katherine Tsarnaev worked up to 80 hours a week as a home healthcare aide and Tamerlan Tsarnaev stayed home to take care of their toddler daughter.

Authorities haven't yet been able to question the widow.

Boston top cop: Bombers likely sought more attacks

Boston's police commissioner says investigators believe the suspects in the marathon bombing were likely planning other attacks.

Commissioner Ed Davis told CBS' "Face the Nation" on Sunday that authorities found an arsenal of homemade explosives following a gun battle between police and the suspects last week in Watertown, Mass.

Davis says authorities have reason to believe 19-year-old Dzhokhar Tsarnaev and 26-year-old brother Tamerlan "were going to attack other individuals."

He says the scene of the gun battle was "loaded with unexploded improvised explosive devices that actually we had to point out to the arriving officers and clear the area."

He said on "Fox News Sunday" authorities cannot be positive there aren't more explosives that haven't been found. But he says the people of Boston are safe.

Boston marathon suspect still in serious condition

The lone surviving suspect in the Boston Marathon bombing remains in serious condition at a hospital under heavy guard.

A spokeswoman for the U.S. attorney's office in Boston gave an update Sunday on the condition of Dzhokhar Tsarnaev.

The 19-year-old Tsarnaev was taken to the hospital Friday after being pulled from a boat in a Watertown backyard. His 26-year-old brother, Tamerlan, died in a gun battle with police.

Massachusetts Gov. Deval Patrick said Saturday that Tsarnaev is apparently unable to communicate at the moment.

There was no immediate word on when Tsarnaev might be charged and what those charges would be. The twin bombings killed three people and wounded more than 180.

Doctor: Dead bomb suspect had wounds 'head to toe'

A doctor involved in treating the Boston Marathon bombing suspect who died in a gunbattle with police says he had injuries head to toe and all limbs intact when he arrived at the hospital.

Dr. David Schoenfeld says 26-year-old Tamerlan Tsarnaev was unconscious and had so many penetrating wounds that it isn't clear which ones killed him. The doctor says a medical examiner will have to determine the cause of death.

Schoenfeld says the suspect was in cardiac arrest and lost a pulse as soon as he arrived at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center following a shootout with police in the Boston suburb of Watertown early Friday. Doctors tried numerous treatments for about 15 minutes before pronouncing him dead.

The doctor said "we did everything we could" to try to save his life.

Gov: Bombing suspect seriously hurt but stable

Massachusetts Gov. Deval Patrick says the surviving suspect in the Boston Marathon bombings is in serious but stable condition.

Patrick spoke outside Fenway Park after appearing in a pregame ceremony at Saturday afternoon's Red Sox game.

Two bombs exploded at the finish line of Monday's Boston Marathon, killing three people. A Massachusetts Institute of Technology police officer was killed during Thursday night's manhunt. More than 180 people were injured in the explosions.

Twenty-six-year-old suspect Tamerlan Tsarnaev was killed Friday. His brother, 19-year-old Dzhokhar Tsarnaev, was captured later Friday inside a boat parked in a Watertown backyard after a furious search. He is recovering at a Boston hospital guarded by armed officers.

The governor declined to comment on the investigation.

FBI interviewed Tamerlan Tsarnaev after 2011 tip

A foreign government told the FBI in early 2011 about information that Tamerlan Tsarnaev, one of the brothers suspected in the Boston Marathon bombings, was a follower of radical Islam.

Tamerlan Tsarnaev died in a shootout, and his younger brother was captured alive. They were identified by authorities and relatives as ethnic Chechens from southern Russia who had been in the U.S. for about a decade.

According to FBI, the foreign government said that based on its information, Tamerlan Tsarnaev was a strong believer and that he had changed drastically since 2010 as he prepared to leave the U.S. for travel to the country's region to join unspecified underground groups.

The FBI says it interviewed Tsarnaev and relatives, and did not find any domestic or foreign terrorism activity.

Bombing suspect, uncle had falling-out over Islam

An uncle of the Boston Marathon bombing suspects says he had a falling-out with one of his nephews because of the man's increased commitment to Islam.

Ruslan Tsarni says he grew concerned about Tamerlan Tsarnaev when he told him in a 2009 phone conversation that he had chosen "God's business" over work or school. Tsarni said he then contacted a family friend who told him Tsarnaev had been influenced by a recent convert to Islam.

Tsarni says the two hadn't spoken since that call. The 26-year-old Tsarnaev was killed in a shootout with police Friday. His younger brother, 19-year-old Dzhokhar Tsarnaev, was captured that evening.

Tsarni says he was relieved his younger nephew was captured alive so he could seek forgiveness from the bombing victims.

Boston Bombing Suspect Hospitalized In Serious Condition

The surviving suspect in the horrifying attack on the Boston Marathon is being held at a hospital after being captured following a pair of shootouts with police.

Authorities say Dzhokhar Tsarnaev is in serious condition after an arrest that happened only after police lifted a lockdown that had largely paralyzed the Boston area.

Officials say Tsarnaev and his brother set off the twin explosions at Monday's marathon, killing three people and injuring more than 180 others.

Twenty-six-year-old Tamerlan Tsarnaev was killed in a shootout with police earlier Friday.

Authorities say the brothers also killed a Massachusetts Institute of Technology police officer during their spree.

A Justice Department official says Dzhokhar Tsarnaev will not be read his Miranda rights before he's questioned by a special interrogation team.

In Boston and beyond, thanks and jubilation

The only sedate place in Boston after the arrest of the surviving marathon bombing suspect may have been the spot were Monday's tragedy unfolded.

Dozens gathered Friday near where the twin bombs exploded to pay solemn tribute to the three killed and more than 180 wounded in the explosions.

Celebrations erupted in many other communities including suburban Watertown where Dzhokhar Tsarnaev was taken into custody after being found hiding in a boat parked in the backyard of a home.

The jubilation was widespread. The mayor of Boston tweeted, "We got him!" And at the home of the New York Mets, fans leapt to their feet and cheered.

Victim's Family Reacts To Bombing Suspect's Capture
 
The family of an 8-year-old boy killed in the Boston Marathon bombing is offering its thanks to the investigators who worked around the clock on the case and the civilians who offered tips and images that helped authorities zero in on two suspects.

Martin Richard's family says it trusts that the justice system will now "do its job" after the arrest of 19-year-old suspect Dzhokhar Tsarnaev Friday night in the Boston suburb of Watertown. His brother and fellow suspect died in a shootout with police.

Martin was killed in Monday's blast along with two other. His mother and sister were among some 180 others wounded.

The family says it continues to "pray for healing and for comfort" for the rest of the victims on their road to recovery.

Justice Official: Boston Marathon Bombing Suspect Will Not Receive Miranda Rights
 
A Justice Department official says the Boston Marathon bombing suspect will not be read his Miranda rights because the government is invoking a public safety exception.

That official and a second person briefed on the investigation says 19-year-old Dzhokhar Tsarnaev will be questioned by a special interrogation team for high-value suspects. The officials spoke on the condition of anonymity because they weren't authorized to disclose the information publicly.

The public safety exception permits law enforcement officials to engage in a limited and focused unwarned interrogation of a suspect and allows the government to introduce the statement as evidence in court. The public safety exception is triggered when police officers have an objectively reasonable need to protect the police or the public from immediate danger.

Celebrations Erupt In Boston After Bombing Suspect's Capture
 
Celebrations erupted in Boston and beyond as the capture of the remaining marathon bombing suspect was announced in a tweet from police.

In the neighborhood where 19-year-old Dzhokhar Tsarnaev engaged in a firefight with police while hiding out in a parked boat, dozens of people at a police barricade cheered and applauded as law enforcement officers and emergency responders left the scene.

Tsarnaev was taken to a hospital after his capture Friday night.

The jubilation was widespread. The mayor of Boston tweeted, "We got him!" In Boston, hundreds of people marched down Commonwealth Avenue, chanting "USA" and singing the Red Sox anthem "Sweet Caroline" as they headed toward Boston Common. Police blocked traffic along part of the street to allow for the impromptu parade. And at the home of the New York Mets, fans leapt to their feet and cheered.

President Obama: Chapter In Tragedy Closed With Suspect's Capture
 
President Barack Obama says the capture of a suspect in the Boston Marathon bombing closes what he calls "an important chapter in this tragedy."

Obama spoke from the White House briefing room shortly after law enforcement took 19-year-old Dzhokhar Tsarnaev into custody in a boat in a Watertown, Mass., neighborhood. His older brother was killed earlier Friday in an attempt to escape police.

Obama says the nation owes a debt of gratitude to law enforcement officials and the people of Boston for their help in the search for the men.

Obama says there are still many unanswered questions about the Boston bombings, including whether the two men had help from others. He is urging the public to not rush to judgment about their motivations.

Bombing Suspect Exchanged Gunfire With Police
 
Police say the 19-year-old suspect in the Boston Marathon bombings exchanged gunfire with law enforcement for an hour while holed up in a boat before being captured.

Boston Police Commissioner Ed Davis says the suspect, Dzhokhar Tsarnaev was hospitalized late Friday in serious condition. 

His brother, 26-year-old Tamerlan, was killed earlier Friday in a furious attempt to escape police. 

The brothers are suspects in Monday's marathon bombings, which killed three people and wounded more than 180 others. The men are also suspected of killing a Massachusetts Institute of Technology police officer in his vehicle late Thursday.

President Obama To Speak About Bombing Suspect's Capture
 
President Barack Obama will speak from the White House Friday night following the capture of a suspect in the Boston Marathon bombing investigation.

Nineteen-year-old Dzhokhar Tsarnaev had been holed up in a boat in a Watertown, Mass., neighborhood. His older brother was killed earlier Friday in a furious attempt to escape police.

Obama was briefed on the situation throughout the day by Attorney General Eric Holder, FBI Director Robert Mueller and other national security officials.

Three People In Custody For Questioning In Bombing 
 
Police say three people have been taken into custody for questioning at a housing complex where the younger marathon bombing suspect may have lived.

New Bedford Police Lt. Robert Richard says a private complex of off-campus housing at the University of Massachusetts at Dartmouth was searched by federal authorities Friday evening.

Richard says the FBI took two males and one female into custody for questioning.

He says 19-year-old suspect Dzhokhar Tsarnaev may have resided at or was affiliated with the housing complex. He is registered at the school. 

Authorities say Tsarnaev was apprehended after a manhunt Friday that paralyzed the Boston area.

Police: Second Bombing Suspect Is In Custody
  
Boston Police say a 19-year-old college student wanted in the Boston Marathon bombings is in custody after a manhunt that left the city virtually paralyzed and his older brother and accomplice dead.

Police announced via Twitter that Dzhokhar Tsarnaev was in custody. His brother, 26-year-old Tamerlan, was killed Friday in a furious attempt to escape police.

The brothers are suspects in Monday's marathon bombings, which killed three people and wounded more than 180 others. The men are also suspected of killing a Massachusetts Institute of Technology police officer in his vehicle late Thursday.

Authorities in Boston had suspended all mass transit and warned close to 1 million people in the entire city and some of its suburbs to stay indoors as the hunt for the remaining suspect went on.

Authorities Surround Second Bombing Suspect In Boat
 
A law enforcement official says the suspect being hunted in the Boston Marathon bombing is in a boat stored in a Watertown, Mass., neighborhood. CBS affiliate WBZ-TV in Boston reports that law enforcement officers were notified when a person found blood by the boat.

The official said he was briefed on the situation and spoke on condition of anonymity because he's not authorized to discuss it publicly.

The official does not know if Dzhokhar Tsarnaev is dead or alive.

Authorities are telling residents of the area to stay indoors.

The burst of activity came at the end of a tense day in and around Boston, and less than an hour after police announced that they were scaling back the hunt because they had come up empty-handed following an all-day search that sent thousands of SWAT team officers into the streets and paralyzed the metropolitan area.

Blasts heard in search for second bombing suspect
 
A round of blasts has been heard in Watertown, Mass., amid the search for the surviving suspect in the Boston Marathon bombings.

Emergency and military vehicles sped through town after an earlier burst of gunfire.

State police spokesman David Procopio says there is "renewed activity in Watertown" is connected to the search for 19-year-old college student Dzhokhar Tsarnaev .

Authorities are telling residents of the area to stay indoors. CBS affiliate WBZ-TV reports that law enforcement were able to find Tsarnaev in a boat behind a house using thermal imaging.

The burst of activity came at the end of a tense day in and around Boston, and less than an hour after police announced that they were scaling back the hunt because they had come up empty-handed following an all-day search that sent thousands of SWAT team officers into the streets and paralyzed the metropolitan area.

Official: FBI interviewed older bombing suspect in 2011
 
A federal law enforcement official says the FBI interviewed the older Boston Marathon bombing suspect at the request of a foreign government in 2011 and that nothing derogatory was found.

The official says the FBI shared its information with the foreign government. The official did not say what country made the request about Tamerlan Tsarnaev or why.

The 26-year-old was killed overnight in a shootout with police outside Boston; his younger brother remains at large.

The official spoke on the condition of anonymity because the person was not authorized to speak about the case publicly.

Shots fired in Mass. as police seek bomb suspect

The Massachusetts State Police spokesman says there is "renewed activity" in connection with the search for the surviving suspect in the Boston Marathon bombings.

Emergency and military vehicles are speeding through town. Police tell The Associated Press that shots have been fired.

State police spokesman David Procopio says there is "renewed activity in Watertown related to today's events."

Authorities are looking for 19-year-old college student Dzhokhar Tsarnaev.

Authorities are telling residents of the area to stay indoors.

Gunshots, police activity in Watertown, Mass.

The sound of gunfire has been reported in Watertown, Mass., where authorities have been searching for a suspect in the Boston Marathon bombings.

Emergency and military vehicles are speeding through town. Police tell The Associated Press that multiple shots have been fired. Boston police say people should stay inside around a street in Watertown.

It wasn't immediately clear whether authorities had found 19-year-old college student Dzhokhar Tsarnaev.

Authorities are telling residents of the area to stay indoors.

Bombing Suspect's Mother-In-Law Sickened By Attack

The mother-in-law of the Boston Marathon bombing suspect killed during a gun battle with police says her family is "sickened" by the horror he inflicted.

Judith Russell's daughter Katherine was married to Tamerlan Tsarnaev, an ethnic Chechen who came to the U.S. from Russia. She says her family realizes they never really knew him. She said in a statement Friday the family can't begin to comprehend the tragedy.

The Russell family lives on a cul-de-sac in a wooded, suburban neighborhood in North Kingstown, R.I. Neighbor Paula Gillette says Katherine Russell left for college a few years ago and when she came back she would dress in Muslim garb with head coverings.

Tsarnaev and his brother are the suspects in Monday's marathon bombing, which killed three people and wounded more than 180. The brother was captured Friday night.

Obama, Putin discuss Boston Marathon attacks

President Barack Obama has spoken by phone with Russian President Vladimir Putin about the investigation into the Boston Marathon attacks.

The two brothers police believe are responsible to Monday's deadly explosions are ethnic Chechens from Russia. An uncle says they lived near Boston and had been in the U.S. for about a decade.

In a statement, the White House says Putin expressed his condolences on behalf of the Russian people. The White House says Obama "praised the close cooperation that the United States has received from Russia on counter-terrorism, including in the wake of the Boston attack.

The White House statement said the two leaders agreed to continue cooperation on counterterrorism and security issues going forward.

Mass. police: Bombing suspect may not have car

Massachusetts State Police say the at-large Boston Marathon bombing suspect fled on foot and may not have a car.

Col. Timothy Alben says police have no indication Dzhokhar Tsarnaev has a vehicle.

Massachusetts Gov. Deval Patrick says mass transit service is resuming in Boston even though Tsarnaev is still on the lam.

Authorities in Boston had suspended all mass transit and warned close to 1 million people in the entire city and some of its suburbs to stay indoors. The other suspect, his brother, died in a desperate getaway attempt.

The brothers are suspects in Monday's marathon bombings, which killed three people and wounded more than 180 others. The men are also suspected of killing a Massachusetts Institute of Technology police officer in his vehicle late Thursday.

Police: Boston bombing suspect still in Mass.

Massachusetts state police say they believe the sole surviving Boston bombing suspect is still in the state because of his ties to the area.

SWAT teams in armored vehicles took command of the tense and locked-down streets of Boston and its suburbs Friday in an all-out hunt for the surviving Boston Marathon bombing suspect after his older brother died in a desperate getaway attempt.

Law enforcement officials and family members identify the suspects as 19-year-old college student Dzhokhar Tsarnaev and 26-year-old Tamerlan Tsarnaev.

Police say the brothers shot and killed an MIT policeman, severely wounded another officer and hurled explosives at police during a furious gun battle and car chase. They say Dzokhar Tsarnaev slipped through officers' fingers in a hail of bullets, running over his wounded brother as he drove off.

Governor says mass transit resuming in Boston

Massachusetts Gov. Deval Patrick says mass transit service is resuming in Boston even though one Boston Marathon bombing suspect is still on the lam.

Authorities in Boston had suspended all mass transit and warned close to 1 million people in the entire city and some of its suburbs to stay indoors as the hunt for one suspect went on. The other suspect, his brother, died in a desperate getaway attempt.

The brothers are suspects in Monday's marathon bombings, which killed three people and wounded more than 180 others. The men are also suspected of killing a Massachusetts Institute of Technology police officer in his vehicle late Thursday.

Patrick reminded people to "remain vigilant if you are out."

Wounded Boston transit officer recovering

The transit police officer who authorities say was severely wounded by the Boston Marathon bombing suspects remains in critical condition at a Cambridge hospital.

Mount Auburn Hospital spokesman Michael O'Connell says the officer had emergency surgery after suffering a single gunshot wound. The 33-year-old Donohue was brought to the hospital at about 1 a.m. Friday after a shootout with the suspects.

Massachusetts Bay Transportation Authority spokesman Joe Pesaturo says Donohue is a married father of a 6-month-old child. He has been with the MBTA's police department for three years.

Donohue graduated in the same police academy class as Sean Collier, the Massachusetts Institute of Technology police officer who authorities say was killed by the two suspects.

One of the bombing suspects is dead. The other remains at large.

Obama speaks to Boston mayor, MA gov on bomb probe

President Barack Obama has called Massachusetts Gov. Deval Patrick and Boston Mayor Thomas Menino to pledge the government's full support in the investigation into the Boston Marathon bombing.

The White House says Obama expressed his condolences over the death of an MIT police officer killed overnight.

Obama received another briefing Friday afternoon in the Oval Office from Lisa Monaco, his counterterrorism and homeland security adviser.

Earlier Friday, he and Vice President Joe Biden were briefed in the Situation Room by his national security team, including Attorney General Eric Holder and FBI Director Robert Mueller.

One suspect is dead and a second remains at large. Thousands of officers have swarmed the streets in a manhunt that has virtually paralyzed the Boston area.

Most family members stand by suspects

Most family members of the Boston Marathon bombing suspects are standing by them, and expressing doubts that the two brothers were actually responsible for the bombings that killed three people and wounded more than 180 others.

Their sister -- whose home was searched by the FBI today in New Jersey -- told reporters she wasn't sure the accusations against her brothers were true. Police said she's cooperating with the investigation. They describe her as "heartbroken, surprised and upset."

Their father, speaking from southern Russia, insists his sons "were set up." He says he saw on TV that his older son, 26-year-old Tamerlan Tsarnaev, was killed by authorities, and that 19-year-old Dzhokar Tsarnaev is being intensely pursued. The father describes the 19-year-old as a "true angel" and an "intelligent boy."

In Toronto, an aunt of the two suspects says the older one recently became a devout Muslim who prayed five times a day. She said she doesn't believe they could have been involved in Monday's attack.

But an uncle who lives in Maryland says he's "ashamed" of his nephews. He urged the 19-year-old to turn himself in and to "ask for forgiveness from the victims."

When he was asked what might have provoked the bombings, Ruslan Tsarni said, "Being losers, hatred to those who were able to settle themselves." He said his nephews had struggled in the U.S. and ended up "thereby just hating everyone."

FBI takes computer from NJ sister of bomb suspects

Police in New Jersey say it appears a sister of the Boston Marathon bombing suspects had no contact recently with her brothers.

The FBI removed a computer and other evidence Friday from the home in West New York, N.J., of Ailina Tsarnaeva.

Police identified the woman Friday evening. They say she told agents she hadn't been in contact with her brothers for a long time.

West New York Police Director Michael Indri says the focus of the investigation was to confirm there was no contact. He says he's confident the FBI confirmed that.

The woman told News12 New Jersey and The Star-Ledger newspaper she has no idea what got into her brothers. At the same time, she says she doesn't know if the accusations against them are true.

Search called off for Honda Civic in bombing case

Massachusetts State Police are calling off a search for a green Honda Civic that has been linked to the suspects in the marathon bombings.

Authorities initially said the at-large suspect in the bombings may have been driving the 1999 Civic, but police said later Friday that the car is in their possession and they are no longer looking for it.

Authorities in Connecticut urged people earlier Friday to be on the lookout for a gray Honda CRV, but police later said that vehicle had been recovered in Boston.

Nineteen-year-old Dzhokhar Tsarnaev  is the target of a massive manhunt. His brother Tamerlan was also identified as a suspect in Monday's twin bombings and was killed in a night of violent clashes with police.

Red Sox, Bruins postpone games during manhunt

The Red Sox and Bruins have postponed their games while authorities search for a suspect in the Boston Marathon bombings.

No makeup date was announced for the opener of the Red Sox three-game series against the Kansas City Royals scheduled for Friday night at Fenway Park. The Bruins game against the Pittsburgh Penguins at TD Garden was rescheduled for Saturday.

Police: Boston bomb suspects spent night in Honda

Massachusetts State Police say a pair of brothers suspected in the Boston Marathon bombings spent the night in a Honda CRV and used it to carjack a Mercedes SUV.

Police said Friday morning at a Watertown news conference that one of the brothers stayed with the carjacking victim for a few minutes and then let him go.

They say one brother drove away in the CRV, and the other one drove away in the Mercedes.

Police say one then ditched the CRV and reunited with his brother in the Mercedes. Authorities say both suspects were in the Mercedes when they encountered police and hurled explosives at officers. Twenty-six-year-old suspect Tamerlan Tsarnaev was killed.

The CRV was later recovered in Boston.

Nineteen-year-old Dzhokhar Tsarnaev remains on the loose.

Uncle urges bombing suspect to turn self in

The uncle of a Boston Marathon bombing suspect is urging his nephew to turn himself in.

Ruslan Tsarni of Montgomery Village, Md., said Friday that 19-year-old Dzhozkar Tsarnaev should turn himself in to police and ask for forgiveness. Officials say Tamerlan Tsarnaev, a 26-year-old who had been known to the FBI as Suspect No. 1, was killed overnight.

The brothers came from a Russian region near Chechnya and lived together in Cambridge, Mass. Tsarni says he hasn't seen them for several years.

He says the family is ashamed. He says he loves the U.S. and respects this country.

Police find SUV believed linked to Boston suspect

Connecticut State Police say a vehicle believed to be linked to a wanted Boston Marathon bombing suspect has been recovered.

Police said in a news release Friday that a gray Honda CRV with Massachusetts plates was found in Boston. Authorities had said earlier that the vehicle "could possibly be occupied by" the suspect wanted in the Boston attacks. The suspect has since been identified by law enforcement officials and family members as 19-year-old Dzhokhar Tsarnaev.

His brother, 26-year-old Tamerlan Tsarnaev, was killed overnight.

The news release provided scant other details about the vehicle.

The two men are suspected of killing a Massachusetts Institute of Technology police officer late Thursday, then stealing a car at gunpoint. Monday's bombings killed three people and wounded more than 180 others.

UMass Dartmouth closed amid bomb suspect search

The University of Massachusetts Dartmouth has closed campus and ordered an evacuation after confirming that a suspect in the Boston Marathon bombings is registered there.

The school did not say what Dzhokhar Tsarnaev is studying or whether he had lived on campus. Police are still searching for him.

School officials say they closed the campus "out of an abundance of caution."

Student Brie McCarron tells The Associated Press that police and SWAT teams have descended on campus. She says students who know Tsarnaev say he lives in a dormitory.

She says: "Everyone is freaking out."

Dartmouth is about 65 miles south of the area where authorities are searching Tsarnaev.

Bruins cancel morning skate; Red Sox on hold

The Boston Bruins and Pittsburgh Penguins have canceled their morning skates because of the manhunt for the Boston Marathon bombers.

Bruins spokesman Matt Chmura said there's no announcement yet on whether to proceed with Friday night's NHL game.

The Boston Red Sox are also on hold for their night game against the Kansas City Royals. Red Sox spokesman Kevin Gregg said the Royals have been in town since Wednesday night and spent their off day in the city on Thursday.

The bombings on Monday killed three people and wounded more than 180 others. Police identified two suspects. One was killed during a shootout with police and the other was being sought during a massive manhunt across the city and surrounding areas.

Chief: Slain MIT officer was dedicated, well liked

The Massachusetts Institute of Technology police officer said to have been shot and killed by the Boston Marathon bombing suspects has been identified as 26-year-old Sean Collier.

The Middlesex district attorney's office says Collier was a Somerville resident who had worked at MIT since January 2012. Before that, he was a civilian employee of the Somerville Police Department.

MIT Police Chief John DiFava says Collier was a dedicated officer who was liked by his colleagues and the MIT community.

Collier was found shot several times in his vehicle in Cambridge at about 10:30 p.m. Thursday. He was pronounced dead at Massachusetts General Hospital.

Authorities say he was shot by the two suspects in Monday's marathon bombings.

Authorities ID name of wounded transit officer

Authorities have identified the transit police officer severely wounded in a shootout with the Boston Marathon bombing suspects.

MBTA Police Chief Paul MacMillan says the wounded officer is 33-year-old Richard Donohue. He is a three-year veteran of the department.

Gov. Deval Patrick says Donohue is in surgery at Mount Auburn Hospital in Cambridge.

The officer was critically injured in an early morning shootout Friday with the two suspects in the marathon bombings. One of the suspects was killed.

Earlier in the night in Cambridge, a Massachusetts Institute of Technology police officer was killed while responding to a report of a disturbance involving the two suspects. The officer died of multiple gunshot wounds.

Uncle of bomb suspects confirms 2nd suspect's name

A U.S. law enforcement official and the uncle of the suspects in the Boston Marathon bombings are confirming that the name of the second suspect is Tamerlan Tsarnaev, the older brother of Dzhokhar A. Tsarnaev, 19. Tamerlan Tsarnaev was killed in a gun battle with police in Massachusetts overnight.

Three law enforcement officials, speaking on condition of anonymity due to the sensitivity of the ongoing investigation, confirmed the bomb suspects were brothers. One of the officials and the men's uncle confirmed the identity of Tamerlan Tsarnaev.

The uncle, Ruslan Tsarni of Montgomery Village, Md., told The Associated Press that the men lived together near Boston and have been in the United States for about a decade. They traveled here together from the Russian region near Chechnya.

Police commissioner: Boston residents urged to stay in homes as hunt for bomb suspect goes on

The Boston police commissioner urged area during a Friday morning news conference to stay indoors as the search continues for 19-year-old Dzhokhar Tsarnaev. 

New photo released of suspect on loose in Boston

Police in Boston have released a new photo showing the man believed to be a suspect in the marathon bombings, shown in earlier footage in a white hat. 

In the new photo, he's wearing a gray hoodie sweatshirt pulled up on his head. The photo was taken at a 7-Eleven in Cambridge, just across the river from Boston. 

AP sources identify the man as 19-year-old Dzhokhar Tsarnaev, of Cambridge, Mass. He is the bombing suspect who is still alive. The other bombing suspect was killed overnight in an exchange of gunfire with police. 

The sources also say both men are from a region of Russia near Chechnya, and have lived in the U.S. for at least a year.

A glance at the search for Boston bomb suspects

Key moments related to the search for the Boston Marathon bombing suspects, based on reports from the, Middlesex County district attorney, Massachusetts State Police, and Boston police.

- At 5:10 p.m. Thursday, investigators of the bombings release photographs and video of two suspects. They ask for the public's help in identifying the men.

- Around 10:20 p.m., shots are fired on the campus of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in Cambridge, just outside Boston.

- At 10:30 p.m., an MIT campus police officer who was responding to a disturbance is found shot multiple times in his vehicle, apparently in a confrontation with the Boston Marathon bombing suspects. He is later pronounced dead.

- Shortly afterward, two armed men reportedly carjack a Mercedes SUV in Cambridge. A man who was in the vehicle is held for about a half hour and then released unharmed at a gas station on Memorial Drive in Cambridge.

- Police, soon pursue the carjacked vehicle in Watertown, just west of Cambridge.

- Some kind of explosive devices are thrown from the vehicle in an apparent attempt to stop police. The carjackers and police exchange gunfire. A transit police officer is seriously injured. One suspect, later identified as Suspect No. 1 in the marathon bombings, is critically injured and later pronounced dead.

- Authorities launch a manhunt for the other suspect.

- Around 1 a.m. Friday, gunshots and explosions are heard in Watertown, just outside Boston. Dozens of police officers and FBI agents converge on a Watertown neighborhood. A helicopter circles overhead.

- Around 4:30 a.m., Massachusetts state and Boston police hold a short outdoor news briefing. They tell people living in that section of eastern Watertown to stay in their homes. They identify the carjackers as the same men suspected in the marathon bombings. Overnight, police also release a photograph of a man believed to be Suspect No. 2, apparently taken from store video earlier in the evening at a 7-Eleven convenience store in Cambridge. He is wearing a grey hoodie-style sweatshirt.

- Around 6:35 a.m., The Associated Press reports that the bomb suspects are from a Russian region near Chechnya and lived in the United States for at least 1 year.

- Around 6:45 a.m., The Associated Press identifies the surviving Boston bomb suspect as Dzhokhar A. Tsarnaev, 19, who has been living in Cambridge, Mass.

1 of 2 Mass. bomb suspects dead; suburbs shut down

Two suspects in the Boston Marathon bombing - identified to The Associated Press as coming from the Russian region near Chechnya - killed an MIT police officer, injured a transit officer in a firefight and threw explosive devices at police during their getaway attempt in a long nig, ht of violence that left one of them dead and another still at large Friday, authorities said.

A law enforcement intelligence bulletin obtained by the AP identified the surviving bomb suspect as Dzhokhar A. Tsarnaev, 19, of Cambridge, Mass.

Two law enforcement officials told AP that Tsarnaev and the other suspect who was not immediately identified have been living legally in the U.S. for at least one year.

Russia's North Caucasus region has been plagued by an Islamic insurgency stemming from separatist wars in Chechnya.

Boston Marathon bomb suspect dead after shootout; MIT police officer also killed

Police say one of two suspects in the shooting of a Massachusetts Institute of Technology police officer is dead and a massive manhunt is underway for another, who is believed to be tied to the Boston Marathon bombing.

Shortly after the MIT officer was shot dead Thursday night, police got a report of a carjacking in Cambridge, just outside Boston.

One of the two suspects in that officer's shooting was killed. Police say of the at-large suspect, "We believe this to be a terrorist."

The FBI said it is working with local authorities to determine what happened.

The MIT shooting on the Cambridge campus Thursday night was followed by reports of violence in nearby Watertown, about 10 miles west of Boston.

State police spokesman David Procopio had said there was a "strong possibility" the incidents are related.

The MIT officer had been responding to report of a disturbance Thursday night when he was shot multiple times, according to a statement from the Middlesex district attorney's office and Cambridge police. It said there were no other victims.

In Watertown, witnesses reported hearing multiple gunshots and explosions at about 1 a.m. Friday. Dozens of police officers and FBI agents were in the neighborhood and a helicopter circled overhead.

State polic, e spokesman David Procopio said, "The incident in Watertown did involve what we believe to be explosive devices possibly, potentially, being used against the police officers."

Boston cab driver Imran Saif said he was standing on a street corner at a police barricade across from a diner when he heard an explosion.

"I heard a loud boom and then a rapid succession of pop, pop, pop," he said. "It sounded like automatic weapons. And then I heard the second explosion."

He said he could smell something burning and advanced to check it out but area residents at their windows yelled at him, "Hey, it's gunfire! Don't go that way!"

MIT said right after the 10:30 p.m. shooting that police were sweeping the campus in Cambridge and urged people to remain indoors. They urged people urged to stay away f, , rom the Stata Building, a mixed-use building with faculty offices, classrooms and a common area.

Hours later, MIT, which has about 11,000 students, said the campus was clear but the shooter was still on the loose.

Police in Boston have released a new photo showing the man believed to be a suspect in the marathon bombings, shown in earlier footage in a white hat.       

In the new photo, he's wearing a gray hoodie sweatshirt pulled up on his head. Police say he's on the loose, and is considered a "threat to "anybody that might approach him."        

Police have called him a "terrorist." Suspect No. 1, also known as the "black hat" suspect was taken into custody and later died.

The new photo was taken at a 7-Eleven in Cambridge, just across the river from the city.

FBI releases images of 2 men at Boston Marathon

The FBI has released photos of two suspects in the Boston Marathon bombings and is asking for the public's help in identifying them.

FBI Agent Richard DesLauriers says one of the suspects is believed to have planted the devices near the finish line of the race. He says both suspects are considered armed and extr, emely dangerous.

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Within moments of the FBI releasing the images on its website, the agency's website crashed.

The explosions Monday killed three people and injured more than 180.

The images were released hours after President Barack Obama and first lady Michelle Obama attended an interfaith service at a Roman Catholic cathedral in Boston to remember the victims, including an 8-year-old boy.

Obamas meet with injured, family of victim

People who were injured in the Boston Marathon bombing have had a visit today from President Barack Obama.

After he attended an interfaith church service in honor of the dead and wounded, Obama went to Massachusetts General Hospital, where he met privately with patient, their families and staff.

The Obamas met earlier at the church with the family of Krystle Campbell, one of the three people killed.

At the church service, Obama vowed to hunt down those responsible for the twin blasts. He said, "You will face justice."

If the bomber or bombers were hoping to "intimidate" or "terrorize" Americans -- Obama says they "picked the wrong city to do it." Like the marathoners themselves, Obama said, "We may be momentarily knocked off, our feet," but that "we'll pick ourselves up."

Obama honors bombing victims in Boston

President Barack Obama declared "there is a piece of Boston in me" as he paid tribute to a city shaken by what he has called an act of terror. He said: "Every one of us stands with you."

Obama addressed an interfaith service in the aftermath of Monday's twin blasts that killed three and injured more 170 people at the finish line of the Boston Marathon.

Obama said a day of beauty was shattered when a celebration became a tragedy.

He said Boston gathered Tuesday, quote, "to reaffirm that the spirit of this city is undaunted."

He declared: "You will run again!"

Of the perpetrator, he said: "We will find you."

Napolitano: 2 men of interest in Boston bomb video

Homeland Security Secretary Janet Napolitano says the FBI w, ants to speak with two men seen in at least one video from the Boston Marathon, but she says she isn't calling them suspects.

Without providing details of the men's appearance or what the video shows, Napolitano told the House Homeland Security Committee on Thursday that "there is some video that raised the question" of two men the FBI would like to interview but said she wouldn't described them as suspects.

Napolitano said it's still unclear whether the bombs that exploded near the finish line of the Boston Marathon were the work of foreign or domestic terrorists. She said the investigation is continuing "apace."

Three people were killed and more than 170 others were injured when the bombs exploded Monday.

Boston official: Video footage shows bomb suspect

A politician says investigators poring over photos and videos from the Boston Marathon bombing have an image of a man dropping off a bag containing one of the bombs.

City Council President Stephen Murphy said Wednesday investigators saw the image on surveillance footage they got from a nearby department store. He says he doesn't know if investigators have identified the man.

Murphy says police officers involved in the probe say investigators have matched information from the surveillance footage with witness descriptions of someone leaving the scene.

Murphy says officers are chasing leads that could take them to the man. He says developing that information within the first 48 hours of the probe is a major breakthrough.

Marathon Rescuer Questioned Amid Bomb Probe

Virtually overnight, a peace activist with a colorful past has turned into a living reminder of both the ho, rror and bravery witnessed in the double bombing at the Boston Marathon.

Fifty-two-year-old Carlos Arredondo was watching from the finish line when the bombs went off Monday. He was caught in a dramatic Associated Press photo pushing a wheelchair with a victim who lost most of his lower legs.

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Visitors to his home Wednesday included reporters and two FBI agents. Arredondo says the agents asked routine questions they hoped would help them solve, the crime.

Arredondo's enlisted son was killed in 2004 by a sniper in Iraq. The grief-stricken father smashed the windows of the family van, climbed inside and set it on fire. He says the fire was an accident.

In 2011, his younger son committed suicide.

Boston court evacuated amid marathon bomb probe

Workers are returning to a Boston federal courthouse that had been evacuated because of a bomb threat amid reports of a breakthrough in the marathon bombings investigation.

The U.S. Marshals Service in Washington says the courthouse was evacuated due to a bomb threat. Spokeswoman Nikki Credic-Barrett says authorities conducted a security sweep.

Court workers are now going back inside the building, about an hour after the evacuation.

Attorney Francis DiMento says he was in a hearing when someone came over the loudspeaker and told everyone to get out.

Crowds of reporters are gathered outside. The FBI and the U.S. attorney's office in Boston say no arrests have been made in the marathon bombing.

The courthouse has a day care attached and at least one crib was wheeled out.

Au, thorities recover pressure cooker lid

Authorities investigating the deadly bombings at the Boston Marathon have recovered a piece of circuit board that they believe was part of one of the explosive devices, and also found the lid of a pressure cooker that apparently was catapulted onto the roof of a nearby building.

A law enforcement official briefed on the investigation confirmed to The Associated Press on Wednesday that authorities have recovered what they believe are some of the pieces of the explosive devices. The official spoke on condition of anonymity because this person was not authorized to publicly discuss evidence in the ongoing investigation.

A person close to the investigation previously told AP the bombs consisted of explosives put in 1.6-gallon pressure cookers, one with shards of metal and ball bearings, the other with nails.

FBI appeals for help , solving marathon bombings

Investigators are appealing to the public to come forward with photos, videos, or, any clues that, could help solve the Boston Marathon bombings.

The FBI has circulated information about the bombs, which involved kitchen pressure cookers packed with explosives, nails and other lethal shrapnel - but authorities say so far nobody has claimed responsibility for Monday's attack.

At a news conference Tuesday the FBI agent in charge in Boston, Richard DesLauriers, said witnesses could have seen a bomber carrying an unusually heavy nylon bag, weighed down with shrapnel-packed explosives.

Investigators are combing surveillance tapes from businesses around the finish line and asking travelers at Logan Airport to share any photos or video that might help.

The bombings killed three people and injured more than 170. 

Intelligence Bulletin Shows Pictures Of Pressure Cooker, Torn Black Bag

An intelligence bulletin issued to law enforcement includes a picture of a mangled pressure cooker and a torn black bag that the FBI says were part of a bomb that exploded during the Boston marathon.

The bulletin was obtained by The Associated Press. 

The FBI says it has evidence that indicates one of the bombs that exploded in the Boston Marathon was contained in a pressure cooker with nails and ball bearings, and it was hidden in a backpack.

 The FBI says the other explosive was in a metal container, but there wasn't enough evidence to indicate that it was a pressure cooker. 

It was not known what was used to set off the two explosives that killed three people Monday and injured more than 170 others.

Third Victim Of Bombing Revealed

The Chinese Consulate in New York says a Chinese national is the third person killed in the Boston marathon blasts. 

An official at the consulate's press section, who was not authorized to give his name, said that one Chinese student was injured and another died in the blast.

The official said a work group from the consulate was in Boston to investigate the situation and assist relatives of the victims.

Hundreds Attend Vigil For Bombing Victims

Hundreds of people gathered for a vigil on the Boston Common sang songs and lit candles one day after the bombing attack on the city's marathon.

Several hundred people turned out Tuesday evening with banners declaring "Peace here and everywhere" and "Boston, you're our home." Participants sang songs including "Amazing Grace" and "The Star-Spangled Banner."

Three people were killed and more than 170 people were injured in the bombings near the end of the race on Monday.

Northeastern University student Scott Turner hugged friends, wept and prayed at the vigil. He said the people of Boston would not be afraid and would respond by showing peace and supporting one another.

There was also a heavy military presence on the Common with dozens of National Guard troops.

DHS: No evidence of broader plot tied to Boston

Homeland Security Secretary Janet Napolitano says there is no evidence that the bombings at the Boston Marathon are part of a wider plot.

Napolitano says DHS will maintain what she called "enhanced security measures at transportation hubs" as a precaution.

Two people briefed on the investigation tell The Associated Press that a pair of bombs packed into pressure cookers and concealed in duffel bags blew up within seconds of each other.

They spoke on condition of anonymity because they were not allowed to discuss the details publicly.

Three people were killed and more than 170 people were wounded in the blasts Monday near the finish line of the Boston Marathon.

Restaurant manager, 8-year-old among bomb victims

A 29-year-old restaurant manager has been identified as one of three people killed in the bombing at the Boston Marathon.

Her father says Krystle Campbell, of Medford, Mass., had gone with her best friend to take a picture of the friend's boyfriend crossing the finish line on Monday afternoon.

William Campbell says his daughter, who worked at a restaurant in nearby Arlington, was "very caring, very loving person, and was daddy's little girl." He says the loss has devastated the family.

He says the friend was seriously injured in the explosion.

An 8-year-old, Martin Richard of Boston, also died. He was at the finish line watching the race with his family.

A look at the bombing at the Boston Marathon

An explosion at the finish line of the Boston Marathon on Monday killed three people and injured dozens more. An at-a-glance look at the facts in the case:

THE EXPLOSIONS

Two bombs exploded about 10 seconds and 100 yards apart at about 2:50 p.m. Monday in Boston's Copley Square, near the finish line of the Boston Marathon. Three people were killed, including an 8-year-old boy, and more than 170 were injured. The explosions occurred four hours into the race and two hours after the winners had crossed the finish line, but thousands of runners were still on the course.

THE INVESTIGATION

The two bombs were fashioned out of 6-liter kitchen pressure cookers, packed with shrapnel and explosives, and hidden in black duffel bags left on the ground, according to a person briefed on the case who spoke on condition of anonymity to discuss the ongoing investigation. No arrests had been made, and police and federal agents renewed appeals for any video, audio and photos taken by marathon spectators.

THE VICTIMS

The 8-year-old boy killed in the bombings, Martin Richard, was remembered by friends and neighbors as a vivacious boy who loved to run, climb and play sports. Also killed was Krystle Campbell, a 29-year-old restaurant manager from Medford, Mass., whose father, William Campbell, said she gone with a friend to watch the race.

PRESIDENTIAL RESPONSE

President Barack Obama said that the bombings were an act of terrorism but that investigators do not know whether they were carried out by an international organization, a domestic group or a "malevolent individual." He said: "The American people refuse to be terrorized."

SECURITY RESPONSE

The area around Copley Square remained closed Tuesday, and security was tight aroun, d Boston, with bomb-sniffing dogs checking Amtrak passengers' luggage at South Station and transit police patrolling with rifles. The Federal Aviation Administr, , , , , , , , , ation bar, red low-flying aircraft within 3.5 miles of the site. Other cities also beefed up security in response to the bombing and the Secret Service expanded its security perimeter around the White House.

WHAT'S NEXT

The FBI, U.S. attorney's office and other law enforcement officials were tentatively planning their next media briefing around 5 p.m. Tuesday. Obama will be briefed Tuesday on the investigation and the ongoing response efforts from FBI Director Robert Mueller, homeland security assistant Lisa Monaco and other senior members of his team.

Person briefed on probe: bombs in pressure cookers

A person briefed on the Boston Marathon investigation says the explosives were in 6-liter pressure cookers and placed in black duffel bags.

The person says the ,, , , explosives were placed on the ground and contained shards of metal, nails and ball bearings. The person spoke on the condition of anonymity because the investigation was ongoing.

The person says law enforcement officials have some of the bomb components but did not yet know what was used to set off the explosives.

President Barack Obama said Tuesday the bombings were an act of terrorism but investigators do not know if they were carried out by an international or domestic organization, or perhaps by a "malevolent individual."

Obama: Boston explosions investigated as terrorism

President Barack Obama says the explosions at the Boston Marathon are being investigated as an act of terror, although authorities still don't know who is responsible.

He, called the bombing "a heinous and cowardly act" used to target innocent civilians.

Obama spoke to reporters at the White House after a briefing by his national security team.

Three people were killed, including an 8-year-old boy, and more than 170 were wounded in Monday's bombing at the famous marathon's finish line.

Mass. Gov Says No Unexploded Bombs At Boston Marathon

Massachusetts Gov. Deval Patrick says no unexploded bombs were found at the Boston Marathon. He says the only explosives were the ones that went off Monday.

Three people were killed, including an 8-year-old boy, by two explosions just seconds apart near the finish line.

Police commissioner Ed Davis says 176 victims came to hospitals around Boston, and 17 of those are in critical condition.

Special Agent in Charge Richard DesLauriers says at a news conference there are no known additional threats.

Police commissioner Ed Davis says it is the most complex crime scene in history of the department.

Authorities are looking for amateur video and photographic evidence that can give clues to whom set off the bombs.

Suffolk County District Attorney Daniel Conley says "what occurred in Boston was an act of cowardice."

More than 130 SC runners were in Boston Marathon

More than 130 South Carolina runners were taking part in the Boston Marathon.

Julia Early of Lexington had finished the marathon and was waiting to get a bag from a bus when she heard an explosion. Early says it sounded like a cannon. She says she made it back to her hotel room and was able to let family and friends know she was safe.

Amanda Perkins of Greenville says she had come across the finish line about four minutes before the first explosion. Perkins says she turned around and saw a gray cloud. She says there was no panic until the second blast.

Chris May and Jacob Driggers of Charleston finished the race about 90 minutes before the explosions. They were back in their hotel when the blasts occurred.

Witnesses describe twin explosions at marathon finish

Spectators and runners are describing the twin explosions that shook the finish line of the Boston Marathon today.

One woman says she was waiting for her husband to cross the finish line, and, in her words, "it just blew." She described it as "a loud boom, and then glass everywhere." Cherie Falgoust says something hit her head, and she "just ducked."

A runner, Laura McLean of Toronto, says she heard two explosions outside the medical tent. She says, "There are people who are really, really bloody." McLean says, "they were pulling them into the medical tent."

The explosions took place about three hours after the winners crossed the finish line. The second one could be heard a few seconds after the first one.

A runner said, "There are a lot of people down."

Marathon workers were seen carrying one woman, who did not appear to be a runner, to the medical area as blood gushed from her leg.

Boston police: At least 3 die in marathon blasts

Police say at least three people have been killed in the explosions near the finish line of the Boston Marathon.

Police commissioner Ed Davis confirmed the three deaths but provided no details.

The explosions Monday also injured, more than 130 people, knocking spectators and at least one runner off their feet.

Some of the victims lost arms and legs. Other injuries included broken bones, shrapnel wounds and ruptured eardrums.

Obama: 'We will find out who did this'

President Barack Obama, responding to the explosions at the Boston Marathon, says the United States does not know "who did this or why" but vowed that whoever is responsible "will feel the full weight of justice."

He said: "We will find out who did this and we will hold them accountable."

Obama made his remarks Monday evening from the White House about three hours after two explosions detonated near the marathon's finish line. At least two people were killed and 50 injured in the blasts.

Obama has been in touch with federal law enforcement and Massachusetts officials in the aftermath of the explosions.

The Secret Service reacted cautiously to the blasts, expanding the security perimeter around the White House.

Senate and House mark deadly explosions

With moments of silence in both ho, uses of Congress, lawmakers are marking the deadly explosions that occurred at the site of the Boston Marathon.

Majority Leader Harry Reid led the Senate in a brief pause, and officials said Speaker John Boehner intended to do the same when the House convened later Monday.

In brief remarks on the Senate floor, Reid expressed sympathy for victims of the explosions, and praised the first responders who rushed to their aid.

Massachusetts Sen. Mo Cowan said he and other members of the Senate are expecting briefings from officials in Boston.

Full Justice Dept. resources probing Boston bombs

Attorney General Eric Holder has directed the full resources of the Justice Department be deployed to investigate the bombs that exploded at the Boston Marathon.

A department official said Holder has spoken with FBI Director Robert Mueller and with Carmen Ortiz, the U.S. attorney for Massachusetts. The official said Ortiz's office was coordinating the department's response with the FBI a, nd other federal, state and local law enforcement authorities.

The official spoke on condition of anonymity because she was not authorized to speak on the record.

Two bombs exploded near the marathon's finish line on Monday, killing two people and injuring many others. A senior U.S. intelligence official said two other explosive devices were found nearby. A third explosion followed at the JFK Library in Boston.

Boston Marathon: Bombs caused pair of explosions

The Boston Marathon says that bombs caused the two explosions heard at the finish line and that organizers were working with authorities to determine what happened.

Organizers made the announcement on the groups' Facebook page on Monday.

Authorities have headed onto the course to carry away the injured while stragglers in the 26.2-mile race were rerouted away from the site.

Two explosions at Boston marathon finish line

Two explosions at the finish line of the Boston Marathon have resulted in injuries.

Bloody spectators were being carried Monday to the medical tent that had been set up to care for fatigued runners. Police wove through competitors as they ran back toward the course.

"There are a lot of people down," said one man, whose bib No. 17528 identified him as Frank Deruyter of North Carolina. He was not injured, but marathon workers were carrying one woman, who did not appear to be a runner, to the medical area as blood gushed , from her leg. A Boston police officer was wheeled from the course with a leg injury that was bleeding.

About three hours after the winners crossed the line, there was a loud explosion on the north side of Boylston Street, just before the photo bridge that marks the finish line. Another explosion could be heard a few seconds later.

Tsarnaev parents heading for U.S.

The parents of the Boston Marathon bombing suspects plan to fly to the U.S. from Russia Thursday.

Their father says he wants to take the body of his son Tamerlan Tsarnaev back to Russia.

The 26-year-old was killed last week in a shootout with police.

Meanwhile, officials say 19-year-old Dzhokhar Tsarnaev has admitted to the FBI that he was involved in the attacks.

Officials: One bombing suspect was in terror database

U.S. officials say the name of the dead suspect in the Boston marathon bombings was added to a U.S. government terrorism database about 18 months before the attacks.

The officials say Russia contacted the CIA in the fall of 2011 with concerns about Tamerlan Tsarnaev.

The Russians also contacted the FBI about Tsarnaev earlier that year. The FBI conducted an investigation and did not find he had any terror connections.

Boston Marathon bombing suspect out of hospital

The surviving Boston Marathon bombings suspect has been released from a civilian hospital and transferred to a federal medical detention center in central Massachusetts.

The U.S. Marshals Service said Friday that Dzhokhar Tsarnaev left Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center overnight and was taken to the Federal Medical Center Devens about 40 miles west of Boston.

The facility, on the decommissioned Fort Devens U.S. Army base, treats federal prisoners and detainees who require specialized long-term medical or mental health care.

The 19-year-old Tsarnaev is recovering from a gunshot wound to the throat and other injuries suffered during his attempted getaway.

The Massachusetts college student was charged with setting off the shrapnel-packed pressure-cooker bombs that killed three people and wounded more than 260 at the marathon finish line April 15.

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