Boston marathon bombing suspect captured - WSPA.com

Boston marathon bombing suspect captured

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BOSTON -

Just a day after the FBI released photos of the Boston Marathon bombing suspects, one of them is dead, and police have taken the other into custody.

Police vehicles converged on a neighborhood in Watertown, Massachusetts after he was found hiding in a boat.

Law enforcement officials say it's 19-year old Dzhokhar Tsarnaev, wanted for the bombings at the Boston Marathon.

People near the area heard explosions as well as shots fired. The boat is in the backyard of a home on Franklin Street.

CBS News has learned the homeowner got out of the residence safely.

This latest break in the case came just after police lifted a lockdown in and around Boston.

Tsarnaev is from a former Soviet Republic near Chechnya. His 26 year old brother, tamerlan, was also a bombing suspect. He was killed in a shootout with police overnight.

The deadly confrontation came hours after the FBI released surveillance video and photos of the brothers.

An uncle of the suspect urged his nephew to surrender.

Tsarnev became a citizen on September 11th of last year. A law enforcement source told CBS News his dead brother had jihadist videos on his internet accounts.

Police say they started zeroing in on the brothers after they shot and killed a campus police officer last night at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

When police caught up with them, the suspects fired at officers and threw explosives from the car as they tried to escape.

Boston was turned into a ghost town after authorities ordered residents to stay inside and businesses not to open. The entire mass transit system was shut down.

 

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