Recall: Plastic Pieces Found In Frozen Pizzas - WSPA.com

Recall: Plastic Pieces Found In Frozen Pizzas

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WASHINGTON -

Nestlé Pizza Company is recalling frozen pizzas that they say may be contaminated with plastic fragments.   The recall is being administered by the U.S. Department of Agriculture's Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) and the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), FSIS.  

The following products are subject to USDA recall:

  • California Pizza Kitchen© Limited Edition Grilled Chicken with Cabernet Sauce, UPC 71921 00781; production code is 3059525952.
  • DiGiorno© Crispy Flatbread Pizza Tuscan Style Chicken, UPC 71921 02663; production codes are 3057525922 and 3058525921.


Each product package above has an establishment number of P-5754.

In addition, the following products are subject to FDA recall:

  • DiGiorno© pizzeria!™ Bianca/White Pizza, UPC 71921 91484; production code is 3068525951.
  • California Pizza Kitchen (CPK) Crispy Thin Crust White©, UPC 71921 98745; production codes are 3062525951, 3062525952 and 3063525951.

Company officials say the problem was discovered after consumer complaints that small pieces of plastic were found in the CPK Crispy Thin Crust White Pizza product. The fragments are described as clear, brittle plastic, in irregular triangles, and may have sharp edges. Nestlé says they believe the problem was related spinach used in the production of three additional varieties of pizza subject to recall.   So far only one consumer injury has been reported when a person chipped a tooth. 

Nestlé says all of the pizzas being recalled were produced between February 26 and March 9 of this year and shipped to retail establishments nationwide.

The FSIS says when available, the retail distribution list(s) will be posted on the FSIS website at www.fsis.usda.gov/FSIS_Recalls/
Open_Federal_Cases/index.asp
.

Consumer questions about the recall should be directed to Nestlé USA Consumer Services at 800-456-4394 or nestlepizza@casupport.com for further instructions. Hours of operation are Monday through Friday, from 8 a.m. to 8 p.m., E.T. and this Saturday, May 4 from Noon to 8 p.m. E.T.

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