A Visit To Your Hairdresser Could Save Your Life - WSPA.com

A Visit To Your Hairdresser Could Save Your Life

Posted: Updated:
Susan McAlister of Head Quarters Salon and Day Spa in Greenville has spotted early signs of skin cancer on several of her customers. Susan McAlister of Head Quarters Salon and Day Spa in Greenville has spotted early signs of skin cancer on several of her customers.
GREENVILLE COUNTY, S.C. -

It is where you go to unwind, catch up with friends or even regain confidence in your look. But it is also a place that may save your life.

"To be able to help someone is really nice," says Susan McAlister, owner of Head Quarters Salon and Day Spa in Greenville.

McAlister is not only good at cuts, blowouts and sharing useful tips; she pays close attention to any changes in her client's hair and skin.

"We see a customer every six weeks, they see their doctor once a year," adds McAlister. "We are going to be the first person to detect something that is unfamiliar."

McAlister has even recommended several people over the years to see a dermatologist after she noticed a suspicious lesion.

She says those who followed her advice found out she had discovered early signs of cancer.

"I felt very confident I was sending them to the right place," McAlister said.

"They are truly in the forefront of catching things early. We don't want to see cancers when they bother people. We want to see cancers when they are just starting," said Dr. John Humeniuk, a dermatologist in Greenville County.

Stylists and barbers have a unique perspective of people's skin.

"We get several cases a year referred by hair professionals," according to Humeniuk.

He says while salon pros, like McAlister are making a difference, it doesn't change the fact that people need to get into the habit of doing a monthly, full-body skin exam.

The American Cancer Society estimates more than 76,000 cases of melanoma will be diagnosed in 2013.

Humeniuk says looking for changes in your moles, freckles and other spots is crucial to early detection, because when you go see your stylist, the only thing they should have to save you from is a bad hair day.

  • Top StoriesTop StoriesMore>>

  • Williamston Shooting Sends Woman To Hospital

    Williamston Shooting Sends Woman To Hospital

    Wednesday, April 23 2014 3:39 AM EDT2014-04-23 07:39:02 GMT
    Williamston police officers are investigating a shooting after a woman was shot in the head on South Hamilton Street.Williamston police officers are investigating a shooting after a woman was shot in the head on South Hamilton Street.
    Williamston police officers are investigating a shooting after a woman was shot in the head on South Hamilton Street. Captain Kevin Marsee says it happened Tuesday night around 10:30 at the victim's home on South Hamilton Street in the city of Williamston.
    Williamston police officers are investigating a shooting after a woman was shot in the head on South Hamilton Street. Captain Kevin Marsee says it happened Tuesday night around 10:30 at the victim's home on South Hamilton Street in the city of Williamston.
  • Update: Governor Haley To Suspend Simpsonville Mayor Eichor

    Update: Governor Haley To Suspend Simpsonville Mayor Eichor

    Tuesday, April 22 2014 10:56 PM EDT2014-04-23 02:56:15 GMT
    Simpsonville Mayor Perry Eichor was arrested Tuesday. He faces charges of Intimidation of a Court Official, Misconduct in Office and Obstruction of Justice following a state investigation.
    Simpsonville Mayor Perry Eichor was arrested Tuesday. He faces charges of Intimidation of a Court Official, Misconduct in Office and Obstruction of Justice following a state investigation.
  • Duke: Moving Coal Ash Would Cost Up To $10 Billion

    Duke: Moving Coal Ash Would Cost Up To $10 Billion

    Tuesday, April 22 2014 8:58 PM EDT2014-04-23 00:58:27 GMT
    Duke Energy Says Customers Will Likely Foot The Bill To Cleanup Coal AshDuke Energy Says Customers Will Likely Foot The Bill To Cleanup Coal Ash
    Duke Energy says that removing all of the company's coal ash away from North Carolina's rivers and lakes would take decades and cost up to $10 billion, with the state's electricity customers likely footing nearly all the bill. Duke's North Carolina president Paul Newton told state lawmakers Tuesday the company needs flexibility to consider more cost-efficient options that include leaving much of its 100 million tons of toxic ash in place after being covered with giant tarps and soil.
    Duke Energy says that removing all of the company's coal ash away from North Carolina's rivers and lakes would take decades and cost up to $10 billion, with the state's electricity customers likely footing nearly all the bill. Duke's North Carolina president Paul Newton told state lawmakers Tuesday the company needs flexibility to consider more cost-efficient options that include leaving much of its 100 million tons of toxic ash in place after being covered with giant tarps and soil.
Powered by WorldNow

250 International Dr.
Spartanburg, S.C. 29303

Telephone: 864.576.7777
Fax: 864.587.5430
Email: webmaster@wspa.com

Can't find something?
Powered by WorldNow
All content © Copyright 2000 - 2014 Media General Communications Holdings, LLC. A Media General Company.