Sekido Technology Expands In Anderson County - WSPA.com

Sekido Technology Expands In Anderson County

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Sekido Technology Expands In Anderson County Sekido Technology Expands In Anderson County
ANDERSON COUNTY, S.C. -

Sekido Technology Corp. is branching out in Anderson County. This is a $3.7 million expansion that created 6 new jobs.

"We are pleased to have the chance to build on our operations in Anderson County. This expansion will help us to meet growing demand and better serve our existing customers. South Carolina has provided us with an excellent business environment and a talented workforce, and we appreciate all the support we've received from state and local officials," said Robert Rhoton, administration manager for Sekido Technology Corp.

 Sekido Technology Corp. uses cold forming technology to make metal components for the automotive and tool industries. The company has added space and equipment to its existing facility, located at 780 Hampton Road in Williamston. 

"It's great to see another one of our state's existing businesses choose to grow its footprint here. We celebrate Sekido Technology Corp.'s decision to invest $3.7 million and create new jobs in Williamston, and we look forward to the company's continued success here in South Carolina," said Gov. Nikki Haley.

"Sekido Technologies Corporation's $3.7 million expansion and addition of new jobs are a welcomed boost to our local economy," said Council Vice Chairwoman M. Cindy Wilson. "Sekido's success coupled with recent announcements from complimentary industries are evidence that Anderson County is rapidly positioning to become a global automotive supply hub in South Carolina." 

 

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