Official: Asiana Flight Flew Too Slow Before Crash - WSPA.com

Official: Asiana Flight Flew Too Slow Before Crash

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A federal aviation official says an Asiana Airlines flight has crashed while landing at San Francisco airport (AP Photo/Antonette Edwards) A federal aviation official says an Asiana Airlines flight has crashed while landing at San Francisco airport (AP Photo/Antonette Edwards)
Asiana Airlines Boeing 777 jet burns after crashing on landing at San Francisco International Airport. Asiana Airlines Boeing 777 jet burns after crashing on landing at San Francisco International Airport.
Site of Boeing 777 Asiana Airlines flight 214 that crashed while landing at the San Francisco International Airport Site of Boeing 777 Asiana Airlines flight 214 that crashed while landing at the San Francisco International Airport
SAN FRANCISCO, CA -

 

July 7, 2013 at 11:49 p.m.

Asiana Airlines says the pilot in control of the Boeing 777 that crashed in San Francisco had little experience flying that type of plane and was landing one for the first time at that airport. Investigators are trying to determine whether pilot error, mechanical problems or something else was to blame for the crash. Data recorders show the jet was coming in too slow.

July 7, 2013 at 10:49 p.m.

Federal safety officials say the pilots of Asiana Flight 214 were flying too slowly as they approached San Francisco airport on Saturday, triggering a warning that the jetliner could stall, and then tried to abort the landing seconds before crashing. 

National Transportation Safety Board chief Deborah Hersman says the Boeing 777 was traveling at speeds well below the target landing speed of 137 knots per hour, or 157 mph. She says "We're not talking about a few knots." 

Hersman says the aircraft's stick shaker -- a piece of safety equipment that warns pilots of an impending stall -- went off moments before the crash. The normal response to a stall warning is to increase speed to recover control. 

There was an increase several seconds before the crash, she says, basing her comments on an evaluation of the cockpit voice and flight data recorders. 

And she says at 1.5 seconds before impact, there was a call for an aborted landing. 

The crash at San Francisco International Airport killed two 16-year-old girls from China and injured dozens of others.

A San Francisco-area coroner whose office received the bodies of two teenage victims of the Asiana plane crash says officials are conducting an autopsy to determine if one of the girls was run over and killed by a rescue vehicle. 

San Mateo County Coroner Robert Foucrault says Sunday that senior San Francisco Fire Department officials notified him and his staff at the crash site on Saturday that one of the 16-year-olds may have been struck on the runaway.

Foucrault says an autopsy he expects to be completed by Monday will involve determining whether the girl's death was caused by injuries suffered in the crash or "a secondary incident."

He says he did not get a close enough look at the victims on Saturday to know whether they had external injuries.

July 7, 2013 at 8:30 a.m.

South Korea says two veteran pilots were flying the Asiana Airlines jetliner when it crashed while landing at San Francisco's airport, killing two people.
    
The Ministry of Land, Infrastructure and Transport says four pilots were aboard and rotated in two-person shifts during the flight from Asia.
    
The ministry identified the pilots at the controls during Saturday's crash as Lee Jeong-min and Lee Gang-guk.
    
Officials say more than 300 passengers and crew members were aboard when it slammed into the runway and caught fire.
    
The two dead were found outside the wreckage. Another 182 people were taken to hospitals, many with minor injuries.

July 6, 2013 at 11:55 p.m.

San Francisco's fire chief says the two people who died in the Asiana airlines crash were found outside of the heavily damaged jetliner. 

Fire Chief Joanne Hayes-White said late Saturday that she did not know the ages or genders of the victims. 

Asiana Flight 214 from Seoul had more than 300 passengers and crew members aboard when it made a hard landing, lost a tail and caught on fire at San Francisco International Airport on Saturday morning. 

More than 180 people were taken to nine area hospitals, but the majority had relatively minor injuries. As of Saturday evening the number of fatalities stood at two while at least five people were reported in critical condition.

July 6, 2013 at 11:40 p.m.

San Francisco's fire chief says authorities have accounted for all the passengers and crew members who were about the jetliner that crashed at San Francisco International Airport.

Fire Chief Joanne Hayes-White said that as of Saturday evening the more than 300 people who were aboard Asiana Flight 214 had been located at either hospitals or the airport.

Earlier Saturday, Hayes-White had reported that authorities did not know where "upwards of 60" people were after the crash.

She says the confusion stemmed from survivors being brought from the wreckage from two different locations.

July 6, 2013 at 10:55 p.m.

The L.A. Times reports that all 307 passengers on the plane are now accounted for.

The chief of the San Francisco Fire Department says that 182 people were taken to local hospitals.

July 6, 2013 at 10 p.m.

At least two people are dead and dozens of others are injured after an Asiana Airlines flight from Seoul, South Korea, crashed while landing at San Francisco International Airport Saturday.

An airport spokesman says 181 people were taken to local hospitals.

Officials say one person is still unaccounted for among the 307 passengers and crew aboard the flight which originated in Shanghai, China and made a stop in Seoul before its trans-Pacific journey.

The investigation has been turned over to the FBI, although terrorism has been ruled out.

The Federal Aviation Administration says Flight 214 crashed while landing before noon PDT. The top of the fuselage of the twin-engine Boeing 777 was burned away and the entire tail was broken off.

The National Transportation Safety Board is sending a team of investigators to San Francisco to probe the crash.

July 6, 2013 at 7:40 p.m.

San Francisco Fire Chief Joanne Hayes-White says that there are two dead in the crash of an Asiana jetliner at San Francisco International Airport. 

She also said several passengers were unaccounted for. She said, "This is a work in progress." 

She said that the scene has been secured and has been turned over to the FBI. Terrorism has been ruled out. 

She said at least 48 people were initially transported from the scene to area hospitals. 

The Federal Aviation Administration said Flight 214 crashed while landing at 11:36 a.m. PDT. A video clip posted to YouTube showed smoke coming from a jet on the tarmac. Passengers could

July 6, 2013 at 6:15 p.m.

A San Francisco General Hospital spokeswoman says 10 passengers from a jetliner that crashed at San Francisco International Airport have been transported to the hospital. 

Rachel Kagan tells KCBS radio the hospital received two children and eight adults, all in critical condition. She says tents are being set up outside the hospital for triage. 

Federal Aviation Administration spokeswoman Laura Brown says Asiana Flight 214 from Seoul to San Francisco, a Boeing 777, crashed while landing on runway 28 left late this morning.

The National Transportation Safety Board says it's sending a team of investigators to San Francisco to probe the crash. 

NTSB spokeswoman Kelly Nantel says NTSB Chairman Deborah Hersman will head the team.

July 6, 2013 at 5:23 p.m.

A federal aviation official says an Asiana Airlines flight has crashed while landing at San Francisco airport. 

The San Francisco fire department says two people died and at least 61 were injured in the crash.

Federal Aviation Administration spokesman Lynn Lunsford says the Boeing 777 crashed at San Francisco Airport while landing on Saturday. 

A video clip posted to Youtube shows smoke coming from a silver-colored jet on the tarmac. Passengers could be seen jumping down the inflatable emergency slides.

The airline is based in Seoul, South Korea.

Our CBS affiliate KPIX there reports the airline says 291 people were on board the Boeing 777, including a group of vacationing Korean school children.

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