Don't Overpay For Antivirus Protection - WSPA.com

Don't Overpay For Antivirus Protection

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Before you purchase a virus protection service for your computer, you may want to take a closer look. Before you purchase a virus protection service for your computer, you may want to take a closer look.
SPARTANBURG, S.C. -

Before you purchase a virus protection service for your computer, you may want to take a closer look.

Just because online search results sites show names like Norton, McAfee and AVG, doesn’t mean you’ve found the official site. And depending on what you choose, you could be paying a lot more than you have to.

Karen Boyd admits she doesn’t know a lot about computers, so when she couldn’t access her email, she looked online for technical support.

“When I googled Norton and clicked on Norton, this other company came up,” Boyd explains. “And you didn’t know it was another company.”

She says the company, PCP Shop, told her she had a virus and sold her protection for two payments of $100 each.

But then, she says they took another $100 out of her account without her approval.

She says she complained to the company with no luck, so we gave them a call.

PCP Shop told us they are not affiliated with Norton, but do provide online technical help for Norton products.

“After the last bill, the last $100, I did call you and ask for the money back,” Boyd explained to the representative.

“And if she didn’t get it, sir, so why does it take me to get her money back?” we asked.

“Miss Karen, I really do apologize if she has called us asking for a refund,” the representative replied. “I will definitely go through all the details and if I find she has called us and nobody has actually processed the refund, I will definitely take strict action against the technician.”

Boyd’s story illustrates the site you go to makes all the difference. PCP charged $300 for a product she could have gotten for less than $100 if she had gone to Norton’s official site.

Also, keep in mind that antivirus companies often offer free protection. It’s not as advanced, but computer experts say most users don’t need the expensive options.

Boyd says she finally got her computer fixed by a company that told her she didn’t have a virus, just an email issue.

They charged her only $18.

To decide which antivirus to chose, you can check the program’s effectiveness by seeing how they rate with the certification and testing agencies. Those reviews will show you a score and help you compare.

Here are some links to a few:

VB100%

Checkmark

ICSA Labs

AV-Test

AV-Comparatives

NSS Labs

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