Fighting depression without drugs in the Triangle - WSPA.com

Fighting depression without drugs in the Triangle

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RALEIGH, N.C. -

Roughly 1 in 10 Americans say they've felt depressed at one point in their life. Many who are battling major depression are running out of options and the drugs to treat it.

But there's an alternative few have heard of that doesn't involve drugs.

The treatment is called Neurostar TMS therapy and it uses magnetic pulses to manipulate parts of the brain that controls mood.

At first it might sound too good to be true - a machine that uses highly focused magnetic pulses to stimulate areas of the brain believed to control mood to help people with depression.

Doctor's say there are little to no side effects and some patients say, it works.

Beth Klenotiz from Raleigh said she has suffered from depression ever since her early twenties. "Now, I look forward to the day, instead of dreading the day" said Klenotiz.

Dr. Rohima Miah is a psychiatrist at Carolina Partners and said that's the ideal outcome. "TMS creates an electrical current about two to three centimeters into the brain and that's modulating the effects of the neurons."

Klenotiz said she's reduced her drug intake from two antidepressants to one. Klenotiz said she wants to get off her medication soon.

"It was just a six week procedure. I came every day Monday through Friday at the same time of day. Had it done. It took 35 minutes," said Klenotiz.

Doctors at Carolina Partners said there isn't enough data yet to prove if this is a permanent solution, but said the majority of their patients see significant improvement.

Eileen Park

Eileen joined WNCN after years of working as a foreign correspondent. During her time off, she enjoys relaxing with her dogs, reading, and exploring the Triangle. More>>

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