Investigators Struggle for Clues in Greenville Fatal Hit and Run - WSPA.com

Investigators Struggle for Clues in Greenville Fatal Hit and Run

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A fatal hit and run victim’s sister came forward Monday with a desperate plea to track down the two drivers responsible for her brother’s death. A fatal hit and run victim’s sister came forward Monday with a desperate plea to track down the two drivers responsible for her brother’s death.
GREENVILLE, S.C. -

A fatal hit and run victim’s sister came forward Monday with a desperate plea to track down the two drivers responsible for her brother’s death.

“I would beg of them to come forward to just even say that they were sorry,” said Tamika Marshall.

It happened on Sulphur Springs Road in Greenville just after 10:30 p.m. Saturday night.

Ricky Terrence Stevens was riding his moped without a helmet when he was hit twice. The first vehicle struck him from behind, throwing him from his moped. Then, another vehicle hit his body lying in the road.

Marshall said her older brother’s upbeat personality earned him an affectionate nickname among his friends.

“The guys around here started calling him ‘Smiley’ because every time they’d see him, they’d be like, ‘Man, you’re always smiling,’” said Marshall.

It’s a smile his family will never see again, except in pictures.

Two surveillance videos surfaced Monday that may help Highway Patrol come up with vehicle descriptions and possibly even tag numbers.

“I hate to use the adage of looking for a needle in a haystack, but that is what we’re doing,” said Marshall.

With no witnesses coming forward, investigators rely mostly on tips from the public.

“A lot of times, people don’t realize that it’s the smallest of tips that they can come forward that end up breaking the case for us. And we need that,” said Rhyne.

Rhyne said if you know someone whose car has new damage that wasn’t there Saturday morning but was on Sunday morning, it may be more than it seems.

Marshall hopes the drivers responsible will come forward on their own.

“We want closure. We want justice. But most of all, we want somebody just to be able to say, ‘I did it. I’m sorry.’ Just anything. Just something,” said Marshall.

You can call in a tip to highway patrol by dialing *47 or 864-241-1000.

From 2011 to now, there have been more than 7,000 hit and runs. About 2,500 people have been injured in those crashes and more than 50 people have been killed.

Fifty-eight hit and run crashes have involved mopeds or similar vehicles. Out of those crashes, 47 people have been injured and five killed.

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