Bill Would Let SC Counties Raise Their Own Gas Tax to Fix Roads - WSPA.com

Bill Would Let SC Counties Raise Their Own Gas Tax to Fix Roads

Posted: Updated:
COLUMBIA, S.C. -

One of the bills prefiled in the South Carolina House would allow counties to ask voters whether they want to raise their own gas tax, with the money staying in the county to improve roads.

Now, the state collects a gas tax of about 16 cents a gallon. That’s the fourth-lowest gas tax in the nation, and it hasn’t been increased since 1987. State lawmakers have rejected bills to raise the state gas tax, but finding a way to pay for needed road and bridge improvements is one of the biggest issues they’re facing. The state DOT says it needs

That’s where the bill, prefiled by Rep. Raye Felder, R-Fort Mill, would come in. County leaders would decide how much the local option gas tax would be, up to two cents a gallon. They would also decide how many years the tax would be collected. Then voters in that county would decide whether they want to pay more at the pump for better roads.

Counties that get a lot of tourists, or that have interstates running through them, might be more interested in raising a local gas tax, since the visitors who use those local roads would be shouldering some of the extra costs to improve them.

Lawmakers go back into session in January.

  • Top StoriesTop StoriesMore>>

  • Update: Governor Haley To Suspend Simpsonville Mayor Eichor

    Update: Governor Haley To Suspend Simpsonville Mayor Eichor

    Tuesday, April 22 2014 10:56 PM EDT2014-04-23 02:56:15 GMT
    Simpsonville Mayor Perry Eichor was arrested Tuesday. He faces charges of Intimidation of a Court Official, Misconduct in Office and Obstruction of Justice following a state investigation.
    Simpsonville Mayor Perry Eichor was arrested Tuesday. He faces charges of Intimidation of a Court Official, Misconduct in Office and Obstruction of Justice following a state investigation.
  • Duke: Moving Coal Ash Would Cost Up To $10 Billion

    Duke: Moving Coal Ash Would Cost Up To $10 Billion

    Tuesday, April 22 2014 8:58 PM EDT2014-04-23 00:58:27 GMT
    Duke Energy Says Customers Will Likely Foot The Bill To Cleanup Coal AshDuke Energy Says Customers Will Likely Foot The Bill To Cleanup Coal Ash
    Duke Energy says that removing all of the company's coal ash away from North Carolina's rivers and lakes would take decades and cost up to $10 billion, with the state's electricity customers likely footing nearly all the bill. Duke's North Carolina president Paul Newton told state lawmakers Tuesday the company needs flexibility to consider more cost-efficient options that include leaving much of its 100 million tons of toxic ash in place after being covered with giant tarps and soil.
    Duke Energy says that removing all of the company's coal ash away from North Carolina's rivers and lakes would take decades and cost up to $10 billion, with the state's electricity customers likely footing nearly all the bill. Duke's North Carolina president Paul Newton told state lawmakers Tuesday the company needs flexibility to consider more cost-efficient options that include leaving much of its 100 million tons of toxic ash in place after being covered with giant tarps and soil.
  • Greenville Moms Accused of Abandoning Babies Charged Differently

    Greenville Moms Accused of Abandoning Babies Charged Differently

    Tuesday, April 22 2014 5:53 PM EDT2014-04-22 21:53:30 GMT
    Sharon Ferguson, left, is accused of abandoning her newborn in a trashcan Monday. She faces a more severe charge than Jessica Blackham, right, who abandoned her baby in a toilet at the Bi-Lo Center in 2011.Sharon Ferguson, left, is accused of abandoning her newborn in a trashcan Monday. She faces a more severe charge than Jessica Blackham, right, who abandoned her baby in a toilet at the Bi-Lo Center in 2011.
    The Greenville woman accused of abandoning her newborn in a trash can Monday faces a more severe charge than the woman who abandoned her baby in a toilet at the Bi-Lo Center in 2011.
    The Greenville woman accused of abandoning her newborn in a trash can Monday faces a more severe charge than the woman who abandoned her baby in a toilet at the Bi-Lo Center in 2011.
Powered by WorldNow

250 International Dr.
Spartanburg, S.C. 29303

Telephone: 864.576.7777
Fax: 864.587.5430
Email: webmaster@wspa.com

Can't find something?
Powered by WorldNow
All content © Copyright 2000 - 2014 Media General Communications Holdings, LLC. A Media General Company.