Malnourished Horses Removed from Laurens Co. Pasture - WSPA.com

Malnourished Horses Removed from Laurens Co. Pasture

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Laurens County Animal Control removed two horses from a pasture in Gray Court, where they say the animals were malnourished and exposed to the elements. Laurens County Animal Control removed two horses from a pasture in Gray Court, where they say the animals were malnourished and exposed to the elements.
LAURENS COUNTY, S.C. -

Laurens County Animal Control removed two horses from a pasture in Gray Court, where they say the animals were malnourished and exposed to the elements.

Animal Control found a third horse dead, its body covered in lye. They said it appears the horse died from starvation and cold.

Joe Mann, who runs Big Oaks Rescue Farm in Greenwood, came to pick up the survivors.

“I'm sorry I’m bent out of shape this morning, but I am bent out of shape,” said Mann.

The horses' owner, who declined to go on-camera, said her horses are healthy.

Laurens County Animal Control estimates the two survivors are 100-200 pounds underweight.

“These animals are suffering. They need help. They can't call 911," said Mann.

Mann said it’s an all-too-familiar scene in recent weeks.

“We've picked up probably 15 horses and donkeys in the last month. This is the most we've ever been called in a month," said Mann.

He said it's time for South Carolina animal cruelty laws to toughen up.

“These animals need help. And the only thing I know that's going to help them is if our lawmakers put some teeth in these laws," said Mann.

“They are out of date," said State Sen. Larry Martin.

There's a pending bill in the legislature that would increase animal cruelty penalties and give law enforcement more options for making arrests. You can read Senate Bill 193 here.

Martin said the bill is a good step, but he'd like to see more done, like preventing repeat violators from owning animals in the future.

“I do think that when somebody has violated the law, particularly in an egregious way, you don't get another bite at the apple. You ought to just be banned from owning animals in the future,” said Martin.

The two surviving horses have been carted out to Big Oaks Rescue Farm, where they will be rehabbed and eventually adopted out to new homes.

Related:
Chain of Cruelty: Loose Animal Neglect Laws in SC

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