Habitat for Humanity Home Burglarized Weeks Before Family Moves - WSPA.com

Habitat for Humanity Home Burglarized Weeks Before Family Moves In

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Habitat for Humanity Home Burglarized Weeks Before Family Moves In Habitat for Humanity Home Burglarized Weeks Before Family Moves In
A Pickens County Habitat for Humanity home was broken into and the thieves stole almost everything. It happened two weeks before the family was supposed to move in.

"I'm in love with my kitchen, that's my favorite room in my house," says Debra Dane, who's getting ready to move into her new home.

Dane has been planning the move for months as she's watched the home take shape. Volunteers with Pickens County Habitat for Humanity and the Easley Presbyterian Church have also been anxiously working to build the home.

Thursday morning volunteers discovered burglars had broken into the home stripping the home of almost everything.

"For somebody to come in and just rip everything apart, it's crazy," Dane says.

Light fixtures, storm doors, shower heads, the microwave, and even the two toilets are all gone. Crooks also robbed the home of heat taking the heating and air unit and water heater. The theft is pushing the home completion even further back.

"They took away everything that this men have done to give us a home to call our own we've never had," Dane says.

Stealing from an organization like this impacts more than just people like Dane. Donations are needed to fund projects. Both time and money will now have to be pulled from other projects to help make Dane's house, a home again.

Tips can be called in to Easley Police at (864) 859-4025
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